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TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 




1976 ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Roster of Town Officials and Committees . 3 

Annual Town Meeting 6 

Operating Budget General Government .... 9 

Board of Selectmen 38 

Town Manager 39 

Assessors Office 41 

Building Inspector 41 

Cemetery Dept 42 

Civil Defense 43 

Collection - Treasury Division 43 

Commuter Rail Committee 44 

Conservation Commission 44 

Dog Officer 45 

Economic and Industrial 

Development Comm 46 

Elec. Light Dept 47 

Essex County Mosquito Control Project... 48 

Fire Station Comm 49 

Fire Dept 49 

Harbors 51 

Government Study Com 50 

Growth Policy Com 50 

Board of Health 52 

Historical Comm 53 

Ipswich Housing Authority 54 



Public Lib rary 55 

Planning Board , 57 

Police Station Study Committee 57 

Police Dept 58 

Public Works Dept 59 

Recreation - Parks Dept 61 

Ipswich School Committee 63 

Superintendent of Schools 64 

Paul F. Doyon Memorial School 66 

High School 67 

Ralph C. Whipple Memorial School 68 

Winthrop School 69 

Burley - Shatswell Schools 70 

Director of Curriculum 71 

Pupil Personnel Services 72 

Enrollment Charts 73 

Shellfish Advisory Board 75 

Town Counsel 75 

Veterans' Services 76 

Water/Sewer Dept 77 

Dept. of Weights and Measures 79 

Youth Commission 79 

Zoning Board of Appeals 80 

Deaths 81 

Ipswich at a Glance 83 



Printing & binding by 
ROWLEY PRINTING, INC. 

ROWLEY, MASS. 



Ml TOWN COUNSEL 

F. Dale Vincent 1977 



SI TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

George C. Mourikas 



1977 



TOWN MANAGER 

Joseph McD. Mitchell 



Ml YOUTH DIRECTOR 

1979 Cathleen McGinley 

APPOINTED 
BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



M BOARD OF ASSESSORS M 

Varnum S. Pedrick 1978 

William P. Lewis 1979 

John D. Heaphy 1977 

M CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Leon B. Turner, Ch 1979 

Gordon C. Player 1977 

Nicholas Markos 1978 

M CIVIL DEFENSE S 

John R. Harrigan, Dir 1977 

Robert D. O'Meara, Assistant 1977 



S COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 

John C. Vincent, Jr., Ch 1977 

Harold F. Balch 1977 

Leland Carter 1977 

Cornelius Cleary 1977 

James C. McManaway, Jr. 1977 

Robert K. Weatherall 1977 

Dorothy Greenlaw 1977 

Alan Sherr 1977 

Donald Whiston J 977 

Margaret D. Ferrini 1977 

James W. Berry 1977 

M6 CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Sarah L. Weatherall, Ch 1979 

Raymond S. Hodgdon, Jr. 1977 

Dr. Robert L. Goodale 1977 

Carol Grimes 1978 

Pattie T. Hall 1978 

William C. Hickling 1978 

Costos Tsoutsouras 1979 



S COUNCIL ON AGING 

Harold Bowen, Ch 
Winifred R. Hardy 
Virginia Cawthron 
Helen Drenth 
Herbert E. Brack 
Percy Cheverie 
Linda Trimmer 



1977 
1977 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1979 
1979 



M ECONOMIC & INDUSTRIAL 
DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

Paul R. Beswick, Ch 1977 

Albert Harkness 1977 

William R. Smith 1978 

Peter W. Williamson 1979 

Joseph Hart 1979 

Alfred Castantini 1979 

Orville Giddings 1980 

Dale E. Dudgeon 1980 

Stephen L. Dietch 1979 



ELECTRIC ADVISORY 
COMMITTEE 

Thomas A. Ercoline, Jr., Ch 

John A. Pechilis 

Arthur S. LeClair 

Lawrence R. Sweetser 

George H. Bouchard 

John H. Ward 

William C. Middlebrooks 



1977 
1977 
1977 
1977 
1977 
1977 
1977 



S FIRE STATION STUDY COMMITTEE 

Merle R. Pimentel 
Joseph McD. Mitchell 
Theodore Mozdziez 
John E. Hansbury 
John Beagan 

04 GROWTH POLICY COMMITTEE 

George R. Mathey, Ch 
John M. Pickard 
William C. Wigglesworth 
Charles K. Cobb, Jr. 
Adele C. Robertson 
Loretta Dietch 
Carol Grimes 
Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 
Merle R. Pimentel 
Alice Shurcliff 

5 GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Irving Small, Ch 1977 

John Eby 1977 

Alfred Castantini 1977 

Jessie Girard 1977 

John J. Griffin 1977 

Jacob Israelsohn 1977 

William H. Smith 1977 

Mary Williamson 1977 



M BOARD OF HEALTH 

Edward B. Marsh, M.D., Ch 
Paul J. Valcour 
William C. Wigglesworth 
Ml Edwin Bronk, Agent 

M6 HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John F. Conley, Ch 
John C. Vincent, Jr. 
Barbara C. Emberley 
Louise B. Hodgkins 
George R. Mathey 
Lovell Thompson 
Alice Keenan 



1979 
1977 
1978 

1977 



1979 
1977 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1979 
1979 



S LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Ann Durey, Ch 
Louise W. Sweetser 
Rev. Robert F. Dobson 
Rae Paul 

Thomas A. Johnson 
Daniel W. Poor, Jr. . 
Alice Keenan 
Phyllis E. Bruce 
Kathryn G. Klinger 
Ml Eleanor M. Crowley, Librarian 

M MOSQUITO CONTROL 
COMMITTEE 

Alice Keenan, Ch 
Lawrence E. Cummings 
Cynthia A. Burns 
Harold Balch 
Herbert E. Brack 
V. Byron Bennett 
Joan E. Oxner 

M PLANNING BOARD 

George H.W. Hayes II, Ch 
John T. Beagan 
George R. Mathey 
Jason A. Sokolov 
John P. Prosser 

05 POLICE STATION STUDY 
COMMITTEE 

George Mathey 
Armahd Brouillette 
Adele Robertson 
Mary E. Williamson 
Roger A. Burke 
Thomas Emery 
Edward L. Nagus 

M RECREATION & PARKS 
COMMITTEE 

Charles J. Foley, Ch 
Elizabeth J. Geanakakis 
Frederick Garand 
Eleanor Knowles 
Ruth E. Dragoni 
James H. Daly, Director 

S REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Barbara J. Rousseau, Ch 
John Kobos 
Daniel W. Markos 
Ml Harold G. Comeau, Clerk 

S SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 

Edward Pacquin, Ch 
Andrew Gianakakis 
Thomas Dorman 
James Carter 
Joseph D. Kmiec 
Philip Kent 
Joseph Leadvaro 



1979 

1977 
1977 
1977 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1979 
1979 



1977 
1977 
1977 
1977 
1977 
1977 
1977 



1977 
1980 
1981 
1978 
1979 



S TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

Elton B. McCauseland 1977 

Mark J. Apsey 1978 

Peter J. Owsiak 1979 

S WATERWAYS STUDY COMMISSION 



Walter G. Petrowicz, Ch 
Kenneth W. Nokes 
Stanley Eustace 
Pierre Doucet 
Charles D. Bayley 
Howard G. Womack 
Robert D. Todd, Jr. 

M YOUTH COMMISSION 

Ml Cathleen McGinley, Dir 
Robert Wickstrom, Ch 
Brother Robert Russell 
Matthew Richards 
Christopher Reagan 
Susan Cole 
Charles H. Cooper 
Ann Horsman 
Thomas A. Perkins 
Louis P. Geoffrion 

S ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos 
Sharon M. Josephson 
William J. Murphy 
Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 
Michael S. Pascucelli 
Thaddeus Maciejowski/Alt 
Mary E. Fosdick/Alt 

M BELL RINGER 

Harold Bowen 

M GAS INSPECTOR 

Glen Wanzer 

M INSECT PEST CONTROL 



1977 




SUPERINTENDENT 


1978 




Armand Michaud 


1978 






1977 




INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 


1979 

1977 




John Wegzyn 




M 


PLUMBING INSPECTOR 


1979 




A.N.D. Hyde 


1977 


M 


ALTERNATE PLUMBING 


1978 




INSPECTOR 


1977 




Rene Rathe 




M 


SEALER OF WEIGHTS & 


1977 




MEASURES 


1977 
1977 




John R. Harrigan 


1977 


M 


TREE WARDEN 


1977 




Armand Michaud 


1977 






1977 


M 


WIRING INSPECTOR 



1977 
1977 
1977 
1977 
1977 
1977 
1977 



1979 
1979 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1979 
1978 
1978 



1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1977 
1977 



1977 



1977 



1978 



1977 



Alfred Tobiasz 



1978 

1977 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL MAY 3, 1976 

Essex, ss. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 
GREETINGS: 

In the Name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby 
directed to notify the Inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich qualified to vote in 
town affairs to meet at the Ipswich High School in said Ipswich on 

MONDAY, THE THIRD DAY OF MAY 1976 
at 7:30 o'clock in the evening to act on the following articles vis: 

Moderator Harold Shively called the Meeting to order at 7:30 p.m. with a 
quorum present. The final count showed 697 voters present. 

The Moderator appointed the following as Tellers: Pam Clark, John Griffin, 
Bruce Paul, Robert Chambers, Leo Marc-Aurele, William Craft, Rainer 
Broekel, Sheila Beyer. 

The Rev. Merle Pimentel gave the invocation and the Moderator led the 
Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag. The Moderator announced that the Warrant 
had been properly posted. 

Mr. Nathaniel Quint moved that visitors and students be allowed into Town 
Meeting. Seconded. Unanimously voted. 

Article 1: To fix the salary and compensation of all elected town officers. 

Article 1. Chairman of the Board of Selectmen Charles Cobb moved that the 
salary and compensation of all elected officers be fixed as in the 1976/77 
budget. Seconded. Recommended by Finance Committee. Motion carried on 
voice vote. 



Article 2: To choose the following officers, viz: 
Moderator for one (1) year 
Selectman for three (3) years 
Constable for one (1) year 

Two (2) Members of the School Committee for three (3) years 
One (1) Member of the Housing Authority for five (5) years 
One (1) Member of the Housing Authority for three (3) years 

The above officers to be voted on one ballot at their respective polling places 
as follows: 

Precinct 1 Ipswich Junior High School, Green Street 
Precinct 2 Winthrop School, Central Street 
Precinct 3 Ipswich High School, High Street 
Precinct 4 Housing Authority Recreation Hall, Caroline Avenue 
on Monday, May 10, 1976. The polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and close at 8:00 
p.m. 

No action required. 

Artocle 3: To choose one (1) member of the Finance Committee toserve for 
three (3) years. 

Selectman John Pickard moved that Edward Nagus be nominated to the 
Finance Committee to serve for three years. Seconded. Motion carried on 
voice vote. 



Article 4. To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee relative 
to the Municipal Budget and raise, appropriate and transfer money for the 
ensuing year, including the compensation of elected Town officers, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Moved by Chairman of the Finance Committee Charles Dalton that the sum 
of $3,004,046. be raised and appropriated for the purposes hereinafter 
designated: 

1. For the Operating Budget $3,004,046. 

Transfer from Available Funds: 

$ 97,984.00 Sewer Receipts Reserve 
1,485.19 County Dog Refund 
8,062.50 Library Aid Reserve 
160,000.00 Surplus Revenue (Free Cash) 
65,000.00 Overlay Surplus to Reserve Fund 
6,460.00 Environmental Protection 
600.00 Bicewntennial Aid 
200.00 Ascension Church cont. 
25.00 Highway Machinery Fund 
3,270.00 Water Pollution Control 
34,000.00 Cemetery Perpetual Care Reimbursement 
1,000.00 Cemetery Flower Fund Reimbursement 
$378,086.69 

Transfer from Revenue Sharing: 

$ 7,000.00 Highway Capital Outlay 
30,000.00 Package Insurance 
30,000.00 Workmen's Compensation Insurance 
110,000.00 Health & Life Insurance 
78,000.00 Sanitation Composite Contract 
25,000.00 Fire Capital Outlay 
$280,000.00 

Vailable Funds & Reserve Sharing $ 658,086.69 

To be Raised and Assessed 2,345,959.31 

Seconded. Mr. Dalton stated that we have no control over the health and life 
insurances and the retirement fund. He suggested that the Board of Selectmen, 
either on their own look for alternatives to the retirement fund, or appoint a 
committee to do so. He thanked all the department heads for their help. 

Mr. Cobb moved to amend the Finance Committee's motion on Article 4 by 
making the following changes in the Report and Recommendations of the 
Finance Committee on the Operating Budget: 

1. Delete Item 8 - Accountant, and substitute the following: 

8 - Accountant - Salaries & Wages $39,953. 

Expenses 6,911. 

Capital Outlay 9,700. 

$56,564. 

2. Delete Item 11 - Town Clerk, and substitute the following: 

11 - Town Clerk - Salaries & Wages $18,348. 

Expenses 1,530. 

$19,878. 



3. Delete from the Public Safety Operating Budget - Item 21 - Police 
Department, and substitute the following: 
21 - Police Department - Salaries & Wages $336,060. 

Expenses 33,930. 

Capital Outlay 8,850. 

$378,840. 

Total General Government $ 312,740. 

Total Public Safety 705,834. 

Total Operating Budget 3,044,306. 

Total Budget $7,124,019. 

Seconded. He explained that the only way the Finance Committee 
recommendations can be changed is by amending on Town Meeting floor. 

The Town Clerk and the Accountant share a clerk; they feel, as does the 
Town Manager and the Selectmen, that they each need a fulltime clerk. Both 
requests were in the original budget and removed by the Finance Committee. 
The Police Department had asked for a lieutenant; this position was also 
removed by the Finance Committee. The Town Manager had, the previous 
afternoon, reached agreement with the Police Department Union and signed a 
memorandum, the effect of which was to give a salary increase of 1Vi% for the 
coming fiscal year and add $2,500. to other accounts in the Police budget. The 
total to be added is $24,755. and the Selectmen unanimously felt that the sum 
should be put into the budget now to fund the contract. The balance represents 
the addition of a lieutenant, promotion of a patrolman to sergeant, and a new 
patrolman. The Selectmen also asked that the salaries format be changed from 
the present form to a more simplified one. 

Mr. Dalton, in opposition, stated that the tax rate had gone up $11., many 
people are living on fixed incomes, the population is growing slowly, the tax 
base is shrinking. The accountant's new mini-computor is not yet doing all it 
should be; he doesn't need another half-clerk. Most of the surrounding towns 
have only a part-time town clerk and the Finance Committee does not think 
that the Town Clerk needs a fulltime assistant. The Police Chief does a good 
job; Town doesn't need a lieutenant. 

Mr. Dalton stated he was shocked to learn of the Manager's agreement with 
the Police Union, as his Committee had not been informed of it. 

Chief Brouillette felt that the Manager did well in holding the Union to a 7.5% 
increase; he is not asking for more manpower, just a position. He mentioned 
the power struggle between the Board of Selectmen and the Finance 
Committee. 

Robert Bamford stated that he opposed the Finance Committee report, and 
the amendment was completely unnecessary. The Town Manager stated that 
the memorandum he had signed did not include longevity or compulsory 
overtime, and it is his job to ratify union contracts. 

The question was moved, and defeated on a voice vote. Mr. Bamford then 
moved to amend the original motion by an across-the-board cut of 3%; there 
was no second. The original motion carried on a voice vote. 



OPERATING BUDGET 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 









Actual 










Appro- 


6 Months 




Recom- 




Expended 


priated 


Ended 


Request 


mend 




1974-65 


1975-76 


12/31/75 


1976-77 


1976-77 


1. MODERATOR: 












Salary 


100 


100 


50 


100 


100 


Expenses 


— 


25 


— 


25 


25 


Total 


100 


125 


50 


125 


125 


2. SELECTMEN: 












Salaries & Wages 


6,963 


7,004 


4,849 


10,400 


11,450 


Expenses 


8,070 


8,850 


4,846 


1,925 


1,925 


Capital Outlay 


— 


75 


— 


— 


— 


Total 


15,033 


15,929 


9,695 


12,325 


13,375 


3. FINANCE COMMITTEE: 












Salaries & Wages 


148 


150 


50 


150 


100 


Expenses 


1,472 


3,660 


65 


1,660 


1,675 




1,620 


2,810 


115 


1,810 


1,775 


4. PLANNING BOARD: 












Salaries & Wages 


518 


700 


225 


700 


700 


Expenses 


226 


1,065 


119 


1,085 


1,025 


Planning Consultants: 












Reimbursable 


— 


10,000 


— 


15,000 


10,000 


Planning Consultants: General 


1,433 


12,500 


447 


— 


— 


Total 


2,177 


24,265 


791 


16,785 


11,725 


5. ELECTIONS & REGISTRATION: 










Salaries & Wages 


9,919 


7,700 


857 


8,400 


8,400 


Expenses 


3,342 


3,600 


— 


3,150 


3,150 


Capital Outlay 


— 


1,550 


— 


— 


— 


Total 


13,261 


12,850 


857 


11,550 


11,550 


6. APPEALS BOARD: 












Salaries & Wages 


440 


400 


180 


400 


400 


Expenses 


312 


275 


130 


392 


392 


Total 


752 


675 


310 


792 


792 


7. TOWN MANAGER: 












Salaries & Wages 


36,614 


39,938 


19,456 


42,970 


42,470 


Expenses 


14,371 


17,420 


6,311 


19,350 


19,350 


Capital Outlay 


88 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Total 


51,073 


57,358 


25,767 


62,320 


61,820 


8. ACCOUNTANT: 












Salaries & Wages 


30,769 


34,828 


16,990 


39,897 


36,253 


Expenses 


7,857 


5,280 


1,416 


6,911 


6,911 


Capital Outlay 


3,861 


9,225 


3,189 


10,000 


8,700 


Total 


42,487 


49,333 


21,595 


56,808 


52,864 


9. TREASURER/COLLECTOR: 












Salaries & Wages 


33,508 


37,059 


18,160 


39,236 


39,236 


Expenses 


6,043 


5,510 


2,768 


5,880 


5,580 


Capital Outlay 


642 


325 


248 


4,400 


4,400 


Total 


40,193 


42,894 


21,176 


49,516 


49,216 


10. ASSESSORS: 












Salaries & Wages 


27,632 


30,276 


15,037 


32,870 


32,450 


Expenses 


3,245 


4,020 


1,361 


3,695 


3,595 


Total 


30,877 


34,296 


16,398 


36,565 


36,045 


11. TOWN CLERK: 












Salaries & Wages 


12,975 


14,028 


6,927 


18,877 


14,648 


Expenses 


1,097 


1,355 


429 


1,530 


1,530 


Capital Outlay 


712 


1,050 


675 


— 


— 


Total 


14,784 


16,433 


8,031 


20,407 


16,178 



12. LEGAL DEPARTMENT; 



Salaries & Wages 


6,889 


7,400 


3,700 


7,600 


7,600 


Other Outside Council 


2,727 


1,000 


829 


— 


— 


Town Council-Litigation 


2,687 


4,000 


1,108 


4,000 


4,000 


Expenses 


140 


280 


30 


1,280 


1,280 


Total 


12,443 


12,680 


5,667 


12,880 


12,880 


INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION: 












Salaries & Wages 


— 


100 


— 


100 


100 


Expenses 


— 


— 


— 


500 


500 


Total 


— 


100 


— 


600 


600 



13. 



14. HISTORICAL COMMISSION: 
Expenses 



160 



700 



20. COUNCIL ON AGING: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Total 

TOTAL 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



129 



15. CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 






Salaries & Wages 566 


720 


230 


Expenses 716 


685 


248 


Capital Outlay 3,612 


8,700 


— 


Total 4,894 


10.105 


478 


16. HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION: 






Expenses — 


150 


— 


17. YOUTH COMMISSION: 






Salaries & Wages 10,450 


11,550 


5,932 


Expenses 9,825 


10,305 


4,673 


Capital Outlay 660 


200 


— 


Total 20,935 


22,055 


10,605 


18. BICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE: 






Salary 600 


600 


300 


Expenses 5,705 


8,050 


4,275 


Total 6,305 


8,650 


4,575 


19. SCHOOL BUILDING NEEDS COMMITTEE: 






Salary 408 


700 


— 


Expenses 69 


1,150 


— 


Total 477 


1,850 


— 



200 



720 
1.075 

1,795 



150 



13.550 
10.705 

24.255 



200 

720 
1,075 

1,795 
150 



13,550 
10.620 

24,170 



1,550 


1.550 


1,550 


1.550 


350 


350 


150 


150 


500 


500 


300 


300 


7,730 


7,730 


8.030 


8.030 



257.571 



314.258 



126.239 



318.963 



305.340 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



21. POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Salaries & Wages 
Chief 
Base 

Incentive 
Holiday 
Total 
Lieutenant 
Base 

Incentive 
Holiday 
Total 
Sergeants(3) 
Base 
Incentive 
Holiday 
Total 
Patrolmen 
Base 
Incentive 
Holiday 
Total 



19.013 


20,320 


10,284 


20.320 


20.320 


2,822 


2 422 


1,512 


2,422 


2.422 


793 


931 


543 


931 


931 


22,628 


23,673 


12,339 


23.673 


23.673 



— (1)15,075 



15,075 



(3)34,890 


(3)37.695 


18,545 


(4)50,260 


(4)50.260 


2,245 


2,205 


1.182 


3.705 


3,705 


1,471 


1,726 


958 


2.301 


2,301 


38.606 


41,626 


20.685 


56.266 


56,266 


(14)144,038 


(15)166,071 


82.159 


(16)176.524 


(16)176.524 


10,424 


11,440 


7,135 


13.685 


13.685 


6,037 


7.605 


4.139 


8.084 


8.084 


160.499 


185.116 


93,433 


198.293 


198.293 



10 



Patrolmen - New 
Base 
Holiday 
Total 
Overtime 
Shift differential 
Court Fees 
Other Salaries 
Total Salaries 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



(1)9,491 

399 

9,890 

13,206 

2,090 

5,364 

4,066 

256,349 

12,616 

8,802 

277,767 



(1)10,453 

479 

10,932 

13,440 

3,059 

6,500 

4,469 

288,815 

28,580 

15,076 

332,471 



5,063 

156 

5,219 

7,575 

2,047 

2,882 

2,158 

146,338 

13,888 

13,153 

173,379 



13,440 

3,059 

6,500 

4,469 

320,775 

31,530 

8,850 

361,155 



13,440 

3,059 

6,500 

4,469 

305,700 

31,430 

8,850 

345,980 



22. DOG OFFICER: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

23. FIRE DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 

Chief 
Base 
Incentive 
Holiday 
Total 
Captains 
Base 

Chief Differential 
Holiday 
Total 
Firefighters 
Base 

Incentive 
Holiday 
Total 
Overtime 

Call Lietuenants (5) 
Call Operator(l) 
Call Men (26) 
Total Salaries 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

24. CIVIL DEFENSE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

25. SHELLFISH: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

26. HARBORS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

27. BUILDING INSPECTOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 



1,500 
1,248 

2,748 



7,600 
1,800 

9,400 



11,239 12,552 

908 1,465 

12,147 14,017 



3,371 
1,154 

4,525 



7,500 

2,300 

2,500 

12,300 



7,500 

2,175 

2,500 

12,175 



17,830 


17,830 


8,822 


17,830 


17,830 


400 


400 


— 


600 


600 


769 


752 


479 


752 


752 


18,999 


18,982 


9,301 


19,182 


19,182 


33,015 


33,015 


16,630 


(3)33,015 


(3)33,015 


— 


— 


— 


375 


375 


1,425 


1,392 


885 


1,392 


1,392 


34,440 


34,407 


17,515 


34,782 


34,782 


1132,619 


(14)132,620 


62,684 


(14)132,620 


(14)132,620 


— 


— 


— 


400 


400 


5,754 


5,590 


3,373 


5,590 


5,590 


138,373 


138,210 


66,057 


138,610 


138,610 


6,992 


7,000 


4,486 


7,462 


7,000 


2,100 


2,100 


1,050 


2,100 


2,400 


700 


700 


350 


700 


800 


14,275 


15,600 


6,800 


15,600 


18,200 


215,879 


216,999 


105,559 


218,436 


220,974 


14,531 


17,082 


4,407 


17,185 


17,285 


3,176 


2,200 


591 


23,125 


28,025 


233,586 


236,281 


110,557 


258,746 


266,284 


1,725 


1,800 


900 


2,100 


2,100 


929 


1,925 


1,073 


1,435 


1,485 


543 


900 


672 


950 


950 


3,197 


4,625 


2,645 


4,485 


4,535 


18,900 


14,025 


7,653 


15,125 


14,650 


2,085 


2,400 


500 


3,150 


2,550 


400 


1,000 


— 


5,425 


5,425 


21,385 


17,425 


8,153 


23,700 


22,625 


2,000 


3,000 


2,000 


3,000 


3,000 


619 


1,520 


429 


1,945 


1,605 


899 


2,000 


1,855 


4,095 


4,095 


3,518 


6,520 


4,284 


9,040 


8,700 



5,293 14,700 11,200 

463 1,475 1,475 

5,756 16,175 12,675 



554,348 



620,739 



309,299 



685,601 



672,974 



11 



HEALTH & SANITATION 



28. HEALTH AGENT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

29. OUTSIDE CONTRACTS: 
Sanitation Composite Contract 
Recycling Collection 

Spring & Fall Cleaning 
Dump Improvement 
Total 

TOTAL HEALTH 

& SANITATION 



14,502 


17,402 


6,291 


16,050 


16,050 


9,157 


10,235 


4,719 


9,835 


9,835 


— 


75 


75 


— 


— 


23,659 


27,712 


1 1 ,085 


25,885 


25,885 


67,000 


92,000 


38,333 


78,000 


78,000 


500 


1,000 


368 


1,000 


1,000 


1,300 


1,300 


650 


1,400 


1,400 


— 


1,500 


300 


— 


— 


68,800 


95,800 


39,651 


80,400 


80,400 


92,459 


123,512 


50,736 


106,285 


106,285 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



30. VETERANS' BENEFITS: 












Expenses 


85,213 


183,000 


38,905 


136,000 


136,000 


Total 


85,213 


183,000 


38,905 


136,000 


136,000 



PUBLIC WORKS 



1. ADMINISTRATION: 












Salaries & Wages 


1212,896 


87 


2,383 


15,232 


15,232 


Expenses 


1,270 


2,150 


424 


2,200 


2,160 


Total 


14,166 


17,237 


2,807 


17,432 


17,392 


2. TOWN HALL: 












Salaries & Wages 


7,788 


8,510 


4,190 


8,979 


8,979 


Expenses 


23,333 


8,400 


2,315 


7,100 


7,100 


Capital Outlay 


426 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Total 


31,547 


16,910 


6,505 


16,079 


16,079 



33. TOWN HALL ANNEX: 
Expenses 



1,685 



5,050 



5,050 



34. HIGHWAY DIVISION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

35. EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE: 
Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Total 

36. SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Rental 
Total 

37. FORESTRY: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

38. SEWER: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Total 



79,310 

97,691 

23,797 

200,798 


89,808 
131,775 

43,500 
265,083 


45,531 
110,892 

33,350 
189,773 


95,018 
199,725 

23,500 
318,243 


95,018 
199,725 

23,500 
318,243 


18,907 

53,227 
72,134 


11,786 
28,198 
39,984 


5,656 
17,379 
23,035 


12,432 
30,388 
42,820 


12,432 
30,288 
42,720 


11,994 

20,050 

8,667 

40,711 


15,000 
22,900 
12,000 
49,900 


8,224 
5,456 

13,680 


15,000 
27,400 
12,000 
54,400 


15,000 
27,400 
12,000 
54,400 


42,426 

12,391 

8,440 

63,257 


47,158 
20,105 
11,100 
78,363 


23,425 
8,088 
9,600 

41,113 


45,628 
22,105 
19,850 
87,583 


45,628 
22,105 
19,850 
87,583 


21,311 
12,832 
34,143 


24,372 
18,709 
43,081 


8,885 

5,205 

14,090 


63,584 
31,900 
95,484 


63,584 
31,400 
94,984 



TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 



456,756 



510,558 



292,688 



637,091 



636,451 



12 



39. RECREATION & PARKS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

40. CEMETERIES: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

41. INSURANCE: 
Motor Vehicle 
Workmen's Compensation 
Package Insurance 
Public Official Bonds 
Legal Liability 

Total 

42. BENEFITS: 

Military Service Credits 
County Retirement System 
Health & Life 
Total 

43. DEBT SERVICE 
Payment of Interest 
Payment of Principal 
Total 

44. LIBRARY: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



57,850 

19,492 

7,218 

84,560 


63,234 

20,638 

700 

84,572 


34,696 
9,467 

44,163 


65,539 

20,495 

14,200 

100,234 


65,539 
19,620 
10,600 

95,759 


54,104 

7,557 

961 

59,622 


55,189 

9,709 

26,980 

91,878 


27,549 

2,918 

26,477 

56,944 


57,835 
10,888 
10,000 

78,723 


57,835 
10,888 
10,000 

78,723 


5,985 

24,487 

29,669 

696 

2,007 

62,844 


7,000 

30,000 

30,000 

750 

2,200 
69,950 


26,388 

28,833 

90 

2,007 

57,318 


9,500 

30,000 

30,000 

900 

2,300 
72,700 


9,500 

30,000 

30,000 

900 

2,300 
72,700 


10,787 
165,802 

65,287 
241,876 


10,000 
170,000 

72,000 
252,000 


170,000 

46,856 

216,856 


12,000 
279,684 
114,000 
405,684 


12,000 
279,684 
114,000 
405,684 


53,073 
302,000 
355,073 


62,370 
333,000 
395,370 


32,773 
245,000 
277,773 


61,395 
242,000 
303,395 


61,395 
242,000 
303,395 


57,780 

24,298 

1,276 

83,354 


60,807 

28,098 

4,300 

93,205 


29,367 
11,410 

40,777 


64,640 

35,420 

800 

100,860 


64,515 

35,420 

800 

100,735 



UNCLASSIFIED 



45. 


RESERVE FUND 














(see schedule) 


— 


228,000 


25,500 


65,000 


65,000 


46. 


BOND ISSUE COSTS 


2,628 


2,500 


— 


10,000 


5,000 


47. 


INTEREST ON TAX 














ANTICIPATION 


8,952 


5,000 


1,953 


40,000 


20,000 




Total 


11,580 


235,500 


27,453 


115,000 


90,000 



TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 



2,345,256 2,974,542 1,539,151 3,060,536 3,004,046 



13 



BUDGET SUMMARY 









Actual 




% of Total 






Appro- 


6 Months 




Recom- 


Recom- 




Expended 


priated 


Ended 


Request 


mend 


mended 




1974-75 


1975-76 


12/31/75 


1976-77 


1976-77 


Budget 


OPERATING BUDGET: 














General Government 


257,571 


314,258 


126,239 


318,963 


305,340 


4 


Public Safety 


554,348 


620,739* 


309,299 


685,601 


672,974 


10 


Health & Sanitation 


92,459 


123,512 


50,736 


106,285 


106,285 


2 


Veterans' Benefits 


85,213 


183,000 


38,905 


136,000 


136,000 


2 


Public Works 


456,756 


510,558 


292,688 


637,091 


636,451 


9 


Recreation 


84,560 


84,572 


44,163 


100,234 


95,759 


1 


Cemeteries 


59,622 


91,878 


56,944 


78,723 


78,723 


1 


Debt Service 


355,073 


395,370 


277,773 


303,395 


303,395 


4 


Insurance Benefits and 














Unclassified 


316,300 


557,450 


301,627 


593,384 


568,384 


8 


Library 


83,354 


93,205 


40,777 


100,860 


100,735 




Total Operating Budget 


2,345,256 


2,974,542* 


1,539,151 


3,060,536 


3,004,046 


42 


EDUCATION BUDGET: 














School Department Budget 














(Article 5) 


3,684,904 


3,568,302 


1,371,266 


3,597,248 


3,831,436 


54 


Whittier Vocational 














(Article 13) 


291,289 


263,612 


131,806 


248,277 


248,277 


4 


Total Education Budget 


3,976,193 


3,831,914 


1,503,072 


3,845,525 


4,079,713 


58 



TOTAL BUDGET 



6,321,449 6,806,456* 3,042,223 6,906,061 7,083,759 100 



^Includes $5,800 appropriated at a special town meeting. 



Article 5: To hear and act upon the report of the School Committee relative to 
the School Department Budget, and raise, appropriate and transfer money for 
the ensuing year's operations, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Chairman of the School Committee Paul Gahm moved that the Town 
appropriate the sum of $3,831,436. for the School Department budget as 
hereinafter designated: 



1000 Administrationd $ 106,969. 
2000 Instruction 
3000 Other School Services 
3500 Athletics 

4000 Operation & Maintenance of Plant 
5000 Fixed Charges 
7000 Acquisition of Fixed Assets 
9000 Programs with other Districts 
Total 
Less: Available Funds 

Feoffees Grammar School 

Title III Funds 

The total to be raised and assessed is: 



2,887,650. 

363,908. 

42.575. 

353,636. 

23,579. 

52,869. 

250. 

$8,831,436. 

7,500 
3,650 

$3,820,286. 



Seconded. Mr. Gahm stated that this budget showed an increase of $100,000. 
or 2.68%, $1.50 less than last year on the tax rate due to reimbursements. The 
Finance Committee unanimously recommended. The Selectmen did not vote on 
the school budget. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 6: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation 
of the revenue for the financial years beginning July 1, 1976 and ending June 



14 



30, 1977 in accordance with the provisions of General Laws. Chapter 44, 
Section 4, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less 
than one year, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 17. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be 
and hereby is authorized to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of 
the revenue for the financial years beginning July 1, 1976 and ending June 30, 
1977 in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
4, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
17. Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on voice 
vote. 

Article 7: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
current expense of the Water Department, the same to be paid from revenues 
by the Water Department during the fiscal year 1977, and to see what action 
the town will take in regard to surplus funds. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town raise and appropriate $271,910. for the 
current expense of the Water Department, the same to be paid from revenues 
by the Water Department during the fiscal year 1977. Seconded. Finance 
Committee recommended unanimously. Motion carried on voice vote. 

Article 8: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
purpose of promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum to be made 
available for said purpose from the Chamber of Commerce. 

Mrs. Kitty Robertson moved that $700. be raised and appropriated to be 
used in conjunction with a matching sum of the Chamber of Commerce of 
Ipswich for the purpose of the promotion of the Town of Ipswich. Seconded. 
Motion carried on voice vote. 

Article 9: To see what action the Town will take to the transfer of any surplus 
funds in the Electric Light Department. 

The Rev. Merle Pimentel moved indefinite postponement. Seconded. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 10: To see what sum the Town will raise and appropriate to pay unpaid 
bills incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid. 

Mr. Silvia moved that the sum of $23,132.13 be raised and appropriated to 
pay unpaid bills incurred in previous year and remaining unpaid: 

Selectmen 

Dr. David M. Jewett $ 10.00 

Legal 

Morris A. Horowitz 420.00 

Accounting 

Essex County Bank 140.25 

Assessing 

Shep's Workshop 2.50 

Arlington Trust 25.00 

Ravenwood Spring Water Co., Inc 12.75 



15 



Fire Department 

J. R. Sousa & Son 217.13 

William G. Heisey, M.D. 30.00 

Peter B. Germond, M.D. 25.00 

Cable Hospital 78.00 

Hunt Memorial Hospital 100.00 

Police Department 

Harry J. Ashe, M.D. 10.00 

Harbors 

Hawthorne Press 75.00 

Treasurer-Collector 

Ipswich Today 90.00 

Health & Sanitation 

Essex Survey Service, Inc. 3,168.81 

School Department 

Electric Light Department 3,013.65 

Memorial Building 

Lumbertown-Ipswich, Inc. 20.27 

Haverhill Gas Company 10.90 

John W. Dan & Son 225.00 

West Chemical Products, Inc. 38.62 

J. R. Sousa & Son 425.06 

Recreation & Parks 

Ruth Norwood 30.00 

Village Meat Market 37.35 

Youth Commission 

Electric Light Department 84.43 

New England Telephone 32.21 



UNPAID BILLS - PRIOR YEARS 

Highway 
Electric Light Department (1974) $14,500.00 

Equipment Maintenance 
Carlson Tire and Alignment (1974) 290.20 

Police Department 
David M. Jewett, M.D. (1974) 10.00 

Recreation & Parks 

David M. Jewett, m.d. (1973) $14,810.20 

TOTAL 1975 Unpaid Bills $ 8,321.93 

TOTAL Unpaid Bills/Prior Years 14,810.20 

$23,132.13 

Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Carried on voice vote. 

16 



Article 11: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for construction of roads under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. 

Edwin Damon moved that the sum of $39,000. be raised and appropriated for 
the construction of roads under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. Seconded. 
Mr. Damon said that Little Neck Road, Turkey Shore Road, Poplar Street, 
Wood's Lane, Waldingfield Road, Linebrook Road were included under this 
article. Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on voice vote. 

Article 12: 

Mr. Damon moved that the sum of $4,500. be raised and appropriated for the 
maintenance of roads under Cahpter 90 of the General Laws. Seconded. 
Finance Committee recommended. Carried on voice vote. 

Article 13: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money to 
cover the Town's share of the annual operating and debt service expenses of 
the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School District. 

Edward Penny moved that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$248,277. to cover the Town's share of the annual operating and debt service 
expense of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School District. 
Seconded. Mr. Penny mentioned that the cost goes down each year as the 
enrollment goes up, this year there are 146 Ipswich students at Whittier. 
Finance Committee recommended; Mrs. Conley voiced their concern that 
assessment costs would rise if state and federal aid were cut back. Board of 
Selectmen recommended. Motion carried on voice vote. 

Article 14: To hear and act upon the reports of committees, and to continue 
such committees as the Town may vote to continue. 

Motion by John Conley that the report of the Historic District Study 
Committee be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

Moved by Alice Keenan that the report of the Mosquito Control Committee 
be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Moved by Irving Small that the report of the Government Study Committee 
be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Moved by William Craft that the report of the School Building Needs 
Committee be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

Moved by Jean Bucklin that the report of the Bicentennial Committee be 
accepted and the committee dissolved. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 15: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain or otherwise for water supply 
purposes for the Town approximately one half acre of land adjacent to the 
present Winthrop Well No. 2 with necessary access easements for installation 
of a. new water well with necessary connections to Town water system, and to 
appropriate a sum of money for said purpose and to see whether said sum may 
be raised by borrowing or otherwise, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved that the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain or otherwise for water supply 
purposes for the Town approximately one-half acre of land adjacent to the 

17 



present Winthrop Well No. 2 with necessary access easements for installation 
of a new water well with necessary connections to the Town water system, and 
to raise and appropriate $28,000. for said purpose. Seconded. Finance 
Committee recommended. The vote was 600 in favor, against. 

Article 16: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain or otherwise for water supply 
purposes a parcel of land located on or in the vicinity of Fellows Road with 
necessary access easements for installation of a new water well with necessary 
connections to the Town water system, and to appropriate a sum of money for 
said purpose and to see whether said sum may be raised by borrowing or 
otherwise, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved that the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain or otherwise for water supply 
purposes a parcel of land located on or in the vicinity of Fellow's Road with 
necessary access easements for installation of a new water well with necessary 
connections to the Town water system, and to raise and appropriate $1,000. for 
said purpose. Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on 
a voice vote. 

Article 17: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
approve land takings by eminent domain by the Water Resources Commission 
in the event that said Commission proposes to acquire land by eminent domain 
under Chapter 767 of the Acts of 1970 for water reservoir 30B as identified by 
said Commission. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to approve 
land taking by eminent domain or otherwise by the Water Resources 
Commission for a water reservoir identified as 30B, in the event that said 
commission proposes to acquire land by eminent domain under Chapter 767 of 
the Acts of 1970. Seconded. John Bialek said that the main objective of the 
Ipswich River Watershed Commission is to keep the land open. Mr. Damon 
stated that 30B is a grandiose proposal which would benefit other cities and 
towns at Ipswich's expense, would provide water we don't need at a cost we 
can't afford, and disrupt people from their homes. Finance Committee 
opposed. Conservation Commission vote was 2-2-1. The motion was defeated 
on a unanimous voice vote. 

Article 18: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for treatment to the Winthrop Well: To determine whether such 
appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds or 
otherwise, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Damon moved that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $75,000. 
for treatment to Winthrop Well No. 2. Seconded. He stated that the Selectmen 
felt it was very important to reduce the iron arid mineral contents of the water 
and, hopefully, eliminate rusty water problems. Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. Unanimous voice vote for article. 

Article 19: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of laying new water mains and other improvements to 
the water system on Hayward Street: To determine whether such appropriation 
shall be raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds or otherwise, or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved that the sum of $28,000. be appropriated for the purpose of 
laying water mains not less than 8" in diameter on Hayward Street, southerly a 
distance of 1500' more or less and that the Treasurer, with the approval of the 

18 



Board of Selectmen, be authorized to issue $28,000. in bonds or notes under 
Chapter 44, Section 8, as amended. Seconded. Hayward Street is located in the 
Industrial area and the town would like to encourage industry to stay. Finance 
Committee recommended. The vote was 489 in the affirmative, 43 in the 
negative. 

Article 20: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to study alternative solutions to the sewer outfall situation at the 
Secondary Treatment Plant: To determine whether such appropriations shall be 
raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds or otherwise: or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $19,500. to 
study alternative solutions to the sewer outfall situation at the Secondary 
Treatment Plant, and to meet said appropriation $4,875. be transferred from 
Sewer Receipts Reserve and $14,625. be raised and appropriated by taxation. 
Seconded. Mr. Cobb stated the federal and state people are concerned about 
the outfall, 500 1 downstream from the plant, running into the Ipswich River. 
When the tide is up, the effluent spreads across the marsh and is verv 
unpleasant. The study would be 75% federally reimbursed. Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended. Finance Committee recommended; Mrs. Conley 
stated that our final reimbursement payment could be withheld if we do not 
make this study. Conservation Commission unanimously supported article. 
Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 21: To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the cost of engineering services for plans and specifications for the 
construction of sewers, sewerage systems and sewage treatment and disposal 
facilities: To determine whether such appropriations shall be raised by 
borrowing, transfer from available funds or otherwise; or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the sum of $146,000. be appropriated for the cost of 
engineering services for plans and specifications for construction of sewers, 
sewerage systems, and disposal facilities to be located in the area of Muddy 
Brook Pump Station, High Street, and Cross-Country Interceptor to Linebrook 
Road, and a portion of Topsfield Road between Oakhurst Avenue and 
Cedarview Road; and to meet this appropriation the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Boad of Selectmen, is authorized to issue bonds or notes in the 
amount of $146,000. under Chapter 44, Section 7(22) of the General Laws as 
amended, and that the Town Manager, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is authorized to contract for and expend State and Federal Grants 
for said services. Seconded. Board of Selectmen 4-1 in favor. Finance 
Committee 6-3 in favor. Conservation Commission 4-2-2 in favor. Planning 
Board in favor. 

Cornelius Cleary stated that this was the same article we voted down last 
November, and it was originally proposed to facilitate the PCD, which is in the 
Ipswich watershed. The PCD is still alive and can remain so for five more 
years. In addition, the engineer is suing the owner to pressure a more rapid 
start of building. If we vote for this article and the PCD is built, we will have 
to consider 30B. 

James Smythe moved that the appropriation be approved subject to the 
contingency that approval is received from the Federal Government for 
reimbursement of $132,300. Seconded. Town Counsel felt bonding would be 
dubious since original article was written by bond counsel. 

Stanley Eustace asked where the line would go and what would it benefit. 
Mr. Silvia indicated on a map Kimball Avenue, High and Mitchell Road, and 
emphasized that the money was only for studies, not physical digging. Mr. 

19 



Cleary said that under Article 3 of May 11, 1970 Special Town Meeting the 
PCD people would pay the cost. Mr. Eustace asked where the Master Plan 
was; Mr. Cobb stated that all areas described are part of the Master Plan. The 
question was moved. A two-thirds majority was needed; the motion was 
defeated 218 for, 314 against. 

Article 22: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of designing and constructing an extension of the 
Sanitary Sewer Systems along County Road from the present termination point 
at Southern Heights, southerly to the so-called Masconomet area and that 
sewers be extended to service Cable Memorial Hospital, Beechwood Road, 
Masconomet Road and Upper River Road; and that the Selectmen be 
authorized to acquire by purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, land and/or 
easements as required for the purpose of construction of the sewer extension; 
and that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be authorized to 
borrow money under General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8 (15) as amended. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the sum of $45,900. be appropriated for the cost of 
engineering services for plans and specifications for the construction of sewers, 
sewer systems, and disposal facilities along County Road from the present 
termination point at Southern Heights, southerly to Masconomet Road, Upper 
River Road, Beechwood Road, and Masconomet Road, and to meet said 
appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
authorized to issue bonds or notes in the amount of $45,900. under Chapter 44, 
Section 7(22) of the General Laws as amended, and that the Town Manager 
with the approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to contract for and expend 
Federal Grant for said service. Seconded. Fred Paulitz raised a point of order 
(the articles were transposed in the Finance Committee Report). Mr. Cobb 
stated that this was for engineering studies only to determine whether the 
sewer would flow down County Road north into the existing sewer system or 
downhill along the river. Nr. Paulitz raised a point of order — is it legal to vote 
on an article not published? The Moderator ruled that the article was 
substantially the same, and therefore it was legal. Finance Committee 
recommended 7-2. Board of Selectmen recommended 4-1. Conservation 
Commission recommended 3-1-1. Planning Board recommended. Leo 
Marc-Aurele spoke in favor, Cornelius Cleary in opposition. A two-thirds vote 
(362) was required; the motion was defeated, with 324 voting affirmatively, 219 
in the negative. 

Article 23: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of designing and constructing an extension of the 
Sanitary Sewer System along County Road, from the present termination point 
at Southern Heights, southerly to the intersection of County and Essex Roads, 
a distance of 1500 feet more or less, and to determine whether such 
appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise, or take any action 
relative thereto. (Petition) 

Dr. Joseph Petranek moved that the sum of $65,000. be appropriated for the 
cost of designing and constructing an extension of the sanitary sewer system 
along County Road, from the present termination point at Southern Heights 
southerly to the intersection of County and Essex Roads, a distance of 1500' 
more or less, and to meet this appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to issue $65,000. in bonds or notes 
under Chapter 44, Section 7(1) of the General Laws as amended. Seconded. 
The purpose of this article is to sewer the hospital; it is the only 
non-government hospital in the state dependent on a leeching field. By his (Dr. 
Petranek's) measurements, the distance is 1,280'. The hospital is currently 
operating on a contingency license. Finance Committee recommended. Board 
of Selectmen recommended. Ipswich Housing Authority recommended, Mr. 

20 



Eustace added that we need our hospital. Conservation Commission 
recommended. The Board of Health unanimously in favor. The motion was 
carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

Article 24: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to study Sewerage and Sewage Disposal in the Great Neck, Little Neck 
and Jeffrey's Neck Road areas and to see what method the Town will adopt to 
raise and appropriate such sum by borrowing or otherwise or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Mrs. Robertson moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $55,000. to study sewerage and sewage disposal in the Great Neck, Little 
Neck, and Jeffrey's Neck Road areas. Seconded. Mrs. Robertson felt that we 
should consider people who bought homes in good faith and now find 
themselves having terrible sewage problems; this is simply a study of 
environmental impact and an engineering study of lines, etc. 

Mr. Nagus said that the Finance Committee had originally recommended 
against the article, not realizing that it was only a Step 1 study, which is 154 
reimbursable. Therefore, the Committee recommended 7-2. Conservation 
Commission voted 1-1-3 present, probably due to lack of information. Attorney 
Paul Gillespie, representing the Proprietors of Great Neck, urged passage. 
Planning Board unanimously in favor, and suggested a zoning change be 
studied for these areas. Mr. Paulitz moved to amend Article 24 to read as 
follows: 'No study shall be conducted nor the appropriated funds expended 
until the zoning for the Summer Residential area (SR) is changed to: minimum 
lot area 43,560 square feet, minimum lot width 190', minimum yard 
requirements — front 50' measured at front wall of the main building at the 
setback line, side 40', rear 30'.' The Moderator ruled the amendment was 
beyond the scope of the original article; Town Counsel agreed with him. Walter 
Mott, representing the Great Neck Association of 130 families, spoke in favor 
of both the article and a zoning change. The motion carried on a vote of 262 in 
favor, 190 against. 

Mr. Gahm moved that the Town Meeting adjourn until Tuesday night, May 
4, 1976 at 7:30 p.m. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. The meeting adjourned 
at 11:05 p.m. 

The Annual Town Meeting reconvened at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 5th 
with a quorum of 516 voters present. 

Article 25: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of conducting a Fair Cash Value Revaluation of all 
properties in the Town: To determine whether such appropriation shall be 
raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds or otherwise; or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $80,000. 
for the cost of conducting an expert Fair Cash Value revaluation of all 
properties in the Town and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to issue bonds or notes in the 
amount of $80,000. under Chapter 44, Section 7(18) of the General Laws as 
amended. Seconded. Board of Selectmen in favor 3-2; felt there are many 
inequities in town assessments. Finance Committee 5-4 against article. Mr. 
Dalton moved to amend the article by not implementing revaluation until the 
majority of cities and towns, including Boston, of the Commonwealth had also 
put revaluations into effect, and also to borrow the money over a five-year 
period. The Moderator felt there was a question as to whether this was placing 
conditions on the article. Town Counsel ruled the amendment was improper 

21 



because it was illegal. The Town's obligation is to comply with the law and the 
law says revaluate now. The amendment would make it conditional. Assessor 
Varnum Pedrick stated that it would be better to do it on our own, picking the 
firm so that we know what it will cost us; this would not be the case if the 
State forced us to do it. Roger Hoy felt the revaluation could be done for much 
less than the amount asked. Nathaniel'Pulsifer spoke in favor. The vote was 
153 in the affirmative, 281 in the negative. 

Article 26: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for renovation, restoration and repair of the upstairs of the Ipswich 
Town Hall, and to see what method the Town will adopt to raise and 
appropriate such sum by borrowing or otherwise, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$48,000. for renovation, restoration and repair of the upstairs of the Ipswich 
Town Hall. Seconded. Board of Selectmen 4-1 in favor. Architect Albert 
Harkness provided the plans gratis, and this is a continuation of a project 
underway for two years. The Town badly needs office space, the building must 
be tightened up to prevent heat loss. Finance Committee 8-1 against. Mr. 
Smythe said it was strictly a matter of priorities, an investigation into 
possibility of federal funds should have been made. Chief Brouillette said 
nothing had been done on the heating plant and the Police Station, which has 
rotting sills, a slit trench downstairs, and other problems. Mr. Silvia stated that 
he felt we need a completely new police station, hopefully within next 
two-three years. $13,000. plus CETA labor has been spent so far on the Town 
Hall. The motion was defeated on a voice vote. 

Article 27: To see if the Town will vote to accept the transfer to the town of 
the custody, management and control of the Elm Street building currently the 
property of the Ipswich Municipal Electric Light Department or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pimentel moved that the Town vote to accept the transfer of the 
custody, management and control of the Elm Street building currently in the 
property of the Ipswich Municipal Electric Light Department. Seconded. 
Electric Department has moved to new facilities and the old building has been 
renovated for use by other Town offices. This is simply a transfer of ownership. 
Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on voice vote. 

Article 28: To see if the Town will vote to rescind the action taken under 
Article 26 at the Annual Town Meeting held March 2, 1953 pertaining to 
Ambulance Service within the town, or take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved that the Town vote to rescind action taken under Article 26 
of the Annual Town Meeting held March 2, 1953 pertaining to Ambulance 
Service within the Town. Seconded. Mr. Silvia explained the misunderstanding 
by reading the original article which provided free ambulance service within the 
Town to a resident and on a call from a physician. These conditions rarely 
apply nowadays. The cost of ambulance service has escalated, major cause is 
General Court ruling that attendants have special training and ambulances must 
have special equipment. He had talked to several services, but in most cases 
the ambulance would be maintained elsewhere unelss we provide a subsidy. 
Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Board of Selectmen 
recommended. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 29: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to provide Ambulance Services for fiscal 1977, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

22 



Mr. Silvia moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$24,000. to provide ambulance service for the fiscal year 1977. Seconded. Mr. 
Silvia felt that perhaps in a few year we will be able to handle our own 
ambulance service again. Finance Committee supported article 8-1. Board of 
Selectmen recommended. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 30: To see if the Town will vote to rescind action taken under Article 15 
at the Annual Town Meeting held March 3, 1975 pertaining to the purchase of 
land and buildings owned by William Rust on Linebrook Road, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the Town vote to rescind action taken under Article 15 
at the Annual Town Meeting held March 3, 1975 pertaining to the purchase of 
land and buildings owned by William Rust on Linebrook Road. Seconded. Mr. 
Cobb explained the background of zoning violations, and said that a question 
had been raised that there is an exception for land taken for public purpose, 
but it applies only to lots which conformed to zoning by-law before transfer. 
Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Mr. Dalton explained that 
revenue sharing money must be used within three years or the government 
takes it back. If we put it back into our revenue sharing account, the Town will 
have it available for another use next year. This vote will not be against a fire 
station in the Linebrook area. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 31: To see if the Town will vote to rescind action taken under Article 32 
at the Annual Town Meeting held March 4, 1974 pertaining to construction of a 
bandstand, or take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town vote to rescind action taken under Article 
32 of the Annual Town Meeting held March 4, 1974 pertaining to construction 
of a bandstand. Seconded. Officials cannot agree on a location for this 
bandstand, so recommend the money be returned to the Town. Finance 
Committee recommended. Motion carried on voice vote. 

Article 32: To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 40, Section 22A, 
regarding the Installation and Operation of Parking Meters, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Cobb moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Motion carried on 
voice vote. 

Article 33: To see whether the Town will vote to remise and release any right, 
title and interest of the Town in the Highway Bridge over the Boston and 
Maine tracks on Waldingfield Road to wit: Bridge No. 1-1-8, R.R. No. 26.19 to 
the Department of Public Works, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, pursuant 
to Chapter 634 of the Acts of 1971. 

Mr. Pimentel moved that the Town authorize the Town Manager to remise 
and release all its right, title and interest to Bridge No. 1-1-8 RR No. 26.19 to 
the Department of Public Works, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, pursuant 
to Chapter 634 of the Acts of 1971. Seconded. This is simply a transfer of 
maintenance and cost to operate to the state. Finance Committee 
recommended. Carried on voice vote. 

Article 34: To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter XV of the General 
By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich by designating the text of Section 5 as 
paragraph (a) and adding the following Schedule of fines at the end of Section 
5, in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 140, Section 173 A as amended: 

(b) Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraph (a) above and of Chapter 
140, Section 173A of the General Laws, the final disposition of each case shall 

23 



be in accordance with the following schedule: 
First offense — Dismissal on appearance 
Second offense — $15.00 fine. 
Third offense — $20.00 fine. 
Fourth and subsequent offense — $25.00 fine. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the Town vote to amend Chapter XV of the General 
By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich by designating the text of Section 5 as 
paragraph (a) and adding the following Schedule of Fines at the end of Section 
5, in accordance with General Laws. Chapter 140, Section 173A as amended: 

(b) Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraph (a) above and of Chapter 
140. Section 173A of the General Laws, the final disposition of each case shall 
be in accordance with the following schedule: 

First offense — Dismissal on appearance 

Second offense — S 15.00 fine 

Third offense — S20.00 fine 

Fourth and subsequent offenses — S25.00 fine 

Seconded. Present schedule has proven ineffective, under $100. was 
collected in fines last year. Daniel Lunt. Jr. asked where the fines go: Mr. 
Cobb said they were collected by the Third District Court and put into Town's 
General Fund. Under Section 173 of Chapter 140 the schedule is not renewed 
each year. Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on voice vote. 

Article 35: To see if the Town will vote to adopt a fee schedule to comply with 
the State Building Code requirements for future construction within the Town 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the Town adopt the following Schedule of Fees for 
Permits issued by the Building Inspector: 

1. Building: 

Commercial and industrial buildings: 

0.0015 x $25.00 per square foot: 
Residential buildings: 

0.0015 x $20.00 per square foot. 

2. Alteration, removdeling. renovation, and repair: 

O.0015 x estimated cost. 

23. Demolition and moving: S 5.00 

4. Occupancy: S 5.00 

5. Accessorv buildings: $10.00 

6. Signs: S10.00 

Seconded. The purpose is to adapt Schedule of Fees as authorized by the 
State Building Code, replacing a schedule which was based entirely on 
estimated cost. Finance Committee recommended. Carried on voice vote. 

Article 36: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to the 
fiscal 1976 Miscellaneous Finance Account for payment of Health and Life 
Insurance Premiums, or take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved indefinite postponement. Seconded. Carried on voice vote. 

Article 37: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to pay 
Interest on Tax Anticipation or take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved indefinite postponement. Seconded. Carried on voice vote. 

24 



Article 38: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to the 
Fiscal 1976 Snow and Ice Expense Account or take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved indefinite postponement. Seconded. Carried on voice vote. 

Article 39: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to the 
Fiscal 1976 Equipment Maintenance Expense Account, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Silvia moved indefinite postponement. Seconded. Carried on voice vote. 

Article 40: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to the 
Legal Account to pay an outstanding bill owed Ralph Arnoldy, Esq., for legal 
services rendered in the case of McCaffrey vs Ipswich Board of Appeals or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town vote to appropriate from available funds in 
the Treasury (Free Cash) $4,950. to pay Ralph Arnoldy, Esq. for legal services 
rendered in the case of McCaffrey vs Ipswich Board of Appeals. Seconded. 
Mr. Pickard explained that the Zoning Board of Appeals got permission from 
the Selectmen to hire Mr. Arnoldy for an amount not to exceed $2,500. Mr. 
Dalton: Town Counsel thought appeal had no merit; he was correct. Mr. 
Arnoldy is billing us for $100. per hour. Mr. Silvia stated he had talked to Mr. 
Arnoldy who refuses to lower his bill and will sue if the amount is not 
forthcoming. Chief Brouillette asked Town Counsel's opinion. Mr. Vincent said 
he had objected to hiring him in the first place, but having done so, it would be 
good policy to pay him. The vote was 218 in the affirmative, 140 in the 
negative. 

Article 41: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to the 
Fire Budget to pay Ipswich Firefighters for Overtime Worked in fiscal 1975, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote to appropriate available funds in the 
Treasury (Free Cash) $15,000. to the Fire Budget to pay Ipswich Firefighters 
for overtime worked in fiscal 1975. Seconded. This is for approximately 2200 
hours actually worked before the November 1974 Special Town Meeting which 
refused to ratify the firemen's contract. Finance Committee recommended 
unanimously. Mr. Dalton mentioned this was the after effect of one of the most 
unfortunate hours in Town's history. On a four-fifths vote, the motion carried 
424 or, 1 against. 

Article 42: To see if the town will vote to accept Chapter 775, Acts of 1975 or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the Town vote to accept Chapter 775, Acts of 1975. 
Seconded. This will allow Town to join the Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale 
Electric Company, allowing us to purchase power from other members or to 
sell our power to other members, and also to share the cost in the building of 
power plants. Finance Committee did not recommend; Mrs. Conley said there 
were many questions concerning economic control, ability to get out of the 
corporation, to which the Committee had not received answers. She moved to 
amend the article 'to postpone acceptance of Chapter 775, Acts of 1975 to the 
next Special Town Meeting.' Seconded. After much discussion, the question 
was moved. The vote on the amendment was 177 in favor, 248 against. The 
original motion was carried on a voice vote. 

Article 43: To see what action the Town will take relative to ratification of 
contract with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority for train service 

25 



provided to the Town during the period January 1 to December 31, 1976. 
(Petition) 

Mr. Pimentel moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $50,000. 
to fund a contract with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority for 
train service provided to the Town during the period January 1 to December 
31, 1976 and to meet said appropriation, $25,000. be transferred from available 
funds in the Treasury (Free Cash) and $25,000. will be raised and appropriated 
by taxation. Seconded. Selectmen unanimously in favor; convinced rail service 
is very important. Finance Committee recommended. John Vincent, Chairman 
of the Ipswich Rail Transportation Advisory Committee, gave the background 
of the article and said he had spoken with Representative David Lane, who 
indicated that it seemed the bill in the House calling for 50% subsidy looked 
promising. Planning Board unanimously recommended. Motion carried on a 
voice vote. 

Mr. Vincent then moved that the report of his committee be accepted and 
the committee continued. Seconded. Carried on voice vote. 

Article 44: To see if the Town will vote to raise, and appropriate a sum of 
money for 99 percent of the Town Employees Blue Cross and Blue Shield. 
Also to pick up all future increases, to keep the percent ratio at 99 percent. 
(Petition) 

Gordon Blaquiere moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money for 99% of the Town Employees Blue Cross and Blue Shield. Also to 
pick up all future increases, to keep the percent ratio at 99%. Seconded. 
Finance Committee unanimously opposed. Mr. Pzenny stated cost of medical 
insurance is a very large expense to the Town and is increasing yearly. 
Questions whether term "Town Employees" in motion is specific enough. 
Board of Selectmen unanimously opposed. Town Counsel felt we would be 
writing a blank check, as no amount was specified. Town Accountant Robert 
Leet stated that there was no mention of Chapter 32B of the General Laws, the 
motion mentions Blue Cross-Blue Shield which is a company, not a service. 
The Chapter is very specific in regard to what must be done to make changes. 
Motion was defeated on a voice vote. 

Article 45: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purchase of a fence and backstop for the new Little League field 
to be known as the Norman Hopping field. (Petition) 

Mr. Bialek moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$3,000. for the erection of a fence and backstop on the new Little League Field 
to be dedicated to the memory of Norman Hopping. Seconded. The Little 
League started twenty years ago with 16 kids, now has 325 and have never 
come to the Town for money before. The new field is more centrally located 
and easier for players to reach. Finance Committee recommended, 6-3. Board 
of Selectmen recommended. Anne Teele asked if girls are eligible for Little 
League, and Mr. Bialek replied that they were, and there is already one girl on 
a team. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 46: To see what action the Town will take to designate roads in the 
Town as "Scenic Roads" according to Chapter 67 of the Acts of 1973, 
including but not limited to: Boxford, Linebrook (from Leslie Road to the 
Topsfield Town Line). (Petition) 

Jacob Hoffman moved that roads in the Town be designated as "Scenic 
Roads" according to Chapter 67 of the Acts of 1973, including but not limited 
to: Boxford Road, Linebrook Road from Leslie Road to the Topsfield Town 

26 



Line. Seconded. Only purpose of the article is that if modifications are made to 
the roads, the Planning Boad or appropriate organization will have to hold a 
public hearing so that people involved will be heard. Finance Committee 
recommended. Board of Selectmen recommended. Conservation Commission 
recommended. Planning Board in favor. Warren Tennant asked if it would 
prevent warning lights. Mr. Mathey replied that the act would go into effect 
only when trees or stone walls are to be removed. Motion carried on a voice 
vote. 

Mr. Gahm moved that Article 52 be taken up at this time. Seconded. Carried 
on voice vote. 

Article 52: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to make major maintenance repairs, renovations, alterations and 
additions to existing public schools and to determine whether such 
appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise, or take any other 
action with respect thereto. 

Mr. Gahm moved that the sum of $150,000. is appropriated for remodelling, 
reconstructing, or making extraordinary repairs to the existing public schools of 
the Town, and to meet this appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to issue bonds or notes in the amount of 
$150,000. under Chapter 44, Section 3(A) as amended. Seconded. Mr. Gahm 
stated the School Committee has been attempting to do something about the 
facilities for years, has come to the conclusion that there will be no new 
schools and so must make necessary repairs on present buildings. Because of 
past criticism, the Committee decided to come before the Town Meeting and 
present the authorized repairs to existing public school buildings (which will 
represent 33# on the tax rate): 

BURLEY SCHOOL: 

New zoned heating system at existing building $14,100.00 

Complete electrical service and fluorescent lighting 20,000.00 

Replace wood fire escapes with metal 6,000.00 

Replace windows, casings, etc. (26) 7,823.50 

SHATSWELL SCHOOL: 

New zoned heating system at existing building 13,300.00 

Complete electrical service and fluorescent lighting 25,000.00 

Replace windows, casings, etc. (26) 7,823.50 

WINTHROP SCHOOL: 

Automatic temperature control system 

Maintenance 4,900.00 

IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL: 
Exterior work: 

Gymnasium roof replacement 6,375 s.f. @ $2.00 12,750.00 

Patch at roof drains — 18 ea @ $100. 1 ,800.00 

Interior work: 
Replace all exterior doors and frames with new 

heavy-duty type — 8 pairs @ $700. 5,600.00 

Sand, seal and repair gymnasium floor 
7,332 s.f. @ $1.25 9,165.00 

TOTAL CONSTRUCTION COSTS 128,262.00 

ARCHITECTS, ENGINEERING FEES, 
BIDDING & ESCALATION TO 
January 1977 @ 25% 21,738.00 



27 



$150,000.00 



Mr. Gahm asked that Mr. Roundy be allowed to take the floor. Seconded. 
Carried on voice vote. He spoke on work to be done, especially at high school. 
Board of Selectmen recommended. Finance Committee recommended, urged 
School Committee to prepare for future renovations well in advance. Mr. Lunt, 
Jr. questioned the discrepancy in size of gym floor and roof, and didn't feel we 
should vote on motion without definite figures. The question was moved. 
Seconded. Carried on a voice vote. On a two-thirds vote (218) needed) 259 
voted in the affirmative, 68 in the negative; motion carried. 

Mr. Cobb moved to bring up Article 53 at this time. Seconded. Carried on 
voice vote. 

Article 53: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to pay Cost of Living increases to eligible retired pensioners, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$20,000. to pay Cost-of-Living Increases to eligible retired pensiones. 
Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Mr. Dalton said only 86 people 
are involved, the average pension is around $2,000. Motion carried on a voice 
vote. 

Article 47: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
establish a Town Harbor and Waterway Committee for the purpose to advise 
and recommend on Harbors and Waterway Matters. (Petition) 

Walter Pietrowicz moved to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to establish a Town Harbor and Waterway Committee for the 
purpose to advise and recommend on Harbors and Waterway matters. 
Seconded. Mr. Pietrowicz gave the background of his article, stating that 
federal approval had been received but not Town. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee against article. The vote was 80 in favor, 133 against. 

Article 48: To see if the Town will vote to establish a Harbor and Waterway 
fund and to transfer from the General Fund to the Harbor and Waterway Fund, 
by a town vote on an annual basis, seventy five percent (75 percent) of the tax 
revenue received from personal property boat tax, for the first ten years and at 
a flexible percentage as required on the following years, and the funds are to 
be used for subsequent harbors and waterways development costs. 

Mr. Pietrowicz moved to see if the Town will vote to petition the State 
General Court for special legislation which would allow establishing a Harbor 
and Waterway Fund, and funding it by a transfer of revenue from the General 
Fund on an annual basis to the amount of 75% of the tax revenue received 
from boats for a period of twenty years (more or less) in order to defray the 
cost of the proposed Ipswich Rvier Navigational Improvement Project as 
approved by the Federal Government. Seconded. Paul Tennant stood to a point 
of order; the Moderator asked him to sit down, which he did. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee against article. The motion was defeated on a 
voice vote. 

Article 49: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Harbor and Wterway 
Committee to conduct a study on local issues, requirements, cost sharing and 
intent relative to the pending Ipswich River Improvement project as approved 
by the Federal Government. (Petition) 

Mr. Pietrowicz asked for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Carried on a 
voice vote. 



28 



Article 50: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
request a review to be conducted by the Corps of Army Engineers, relative to 
the pending Ipswich River Navigational Improvement Project as approved by 
the Federal Government. (Petition) 

Mr. Pietrowicz asked for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Carried on a 
voice vote. 

Article 51: To see if the town will vote to recommend to the Superintendent 
and the School Committee to eliminate the newly created position of business 
manager for the Ipswich School Department. 

Mr. Gahm asked for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Carried on voice 
vote. 

On a motion made and seconded, and carried on a voice vote, the Town 
Meeting adjourned at 10:35 p.m. 

ATTEST: 

Harold G. Comeau, Town Clerk 



29 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 



JULY 1, 1976 



The Moderator announced at 7:30 p.m. that there was no quorum; it was 
moved, seconded and voted to wait until 7:45. At 7:45 p.m. there was still no 
quorum and it was voted to wait another fifteen minutes. At 8:00 with only 266 
voters present, Selectmen Chairman John Pickard moved that the meeting be 
posponed until Monday, July 12, 1976 at 7:30 p.m. Seconded and so voted. 



IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 



JULY 12, 1976 



At 7:30 p.m. the Moderator announced that there was not a quorum present 
and asked that we wait fifteen minutes. At 7:45 with only thirty more voters 
needed to make the quorum of 331, it was moved, seconded and so voted to 
wait until 8:00. At 8:00 the Moderator announced that there was a quorum of 
332 people present and opened the Town Meeting. A motion was made, 
seconded and so voted to allow visitors to enter and sit along the front wall. 

Tellers appointed were: Margaret Broekel, John Conley, John Griffin, 
Frederick Johnson, and Richard Nylen. 

Finance Committee member Thomas Emery questioned the quorum. 
Seconded. The count is 314. Teller Johnson informed the Moderator that there 
were about seventeen voters out in the hall. The Moderator asked all to come 
in and take seats, and had a recount. This showed 338 voters present. The final 
count was 349. 



Article 1.: Mrs. Adele Robertson moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sume of $31,663. to the Police Department budget for fiscal 
1976-1977. Said appropriation to be allocated as follows: 



Salary & Wages: 



Chief 
Base 
Incentive 
Holiday 
Total 



$ 1525 

855 

73 
2453 



Sergeants 
Base 
Incentive 
Holiday 
Total 



5084 
1299 

235 
6618 



Patrolmen 
Base 
Incentive 
Holiday 
Total 



15485 
1976 

739 
18200 



Shift Differential 
Other Salaries 

Total S & W 

Expenses 

Total Increases 



1933 
359 



$29563 

2100 

$31663 



30 



This increase brings the total Police Department budget for fiscal 1976-77 to 
$377,643. Seconded. Mrs. Robertson stated that the Selectmen supported this 
article with four feeling that it was a fair contract. Finance Committee 
Chairman Charles Dalton reported that the Finance Committee supported the 
article 5-4 with the five in favor having serious reservations: 1) voters were 
being asked to vote on funding a Memo of Agreement, not having been 
informed as to the terms of the contract; 2) the second year of the contract will 
raise costs, and other Town Employee groups will feel they should be getting 
more benefits; 3) the Town Manager's figures are optimistic, particularly in 
regard to overtime; 4) the threat of compulsory arbitration is being used as a 
lever. 

Member Lawrence Pzenny presented the minority report: The average 
citizen, including those voters present, do not get raises like those proposed; 
other department heads receive between $10,000-13,000, work long hours and 
don't receive overtime; when the 4-2 working week goes into effect, it will 
result in the loss of 68 manweeks per year, causing an increase in overtime and 
a decrease in protection. The motion was carried on a voice vote. 

Article 2.: To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the purpose of retaining an architect and for related matters in connection 
with planning of a new police station, and to detemine whether such 
appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town Meeting appoint a Police Station Building 
Study Committee and that the Selectmen be empowered to appoint three (3) 
voters, the Moderator two (2) voters, and the Finance Committee two (2) 
voters to said Committee, and that said Committee report to the next Annual 
Town Meeting. Seconded. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 3.: To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
engineering work, surveys, plans, services and materials fo the Town Dump in 
order to meet requirements prescribed by the State Department of 
Environmental Quality Engineering and the Attorney General, and to determine 
whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Town Counsel Dale Vincent moved that $95,000. is appropriated for the 
purpose of paying the cost of engineering work, surveys, plans, services, and 
materials for improvements at the Town Dump in order for such dump to meet 
requirements prescribed by the State Department of Environmental Quality 
Engineering and the Attorney General; that to raise this appropriation the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow $95,000; 
and that the Selectmen are authorized to petition the General Court to enact 
any special legislation necessary to authorize the Town to finance the above 
appropriation by borrowing. Seconded. Mr. Vincent stated that if we vote 
"no" the Court could close the dump and force us to keep garbage in our 
households or truck it out to some other town at an exorbitant rate, if we could 
find a town to take it. Selectmen in favor. Mrs. Conley stated that the Finance 
Committee reluctantly supported the motion, as they felt this situation should 
not have happened. The Town has been notified several times since 1971 that it 
was in violation of the regulations and nothing was done to rectify the 
situation. She reminded that a dump is no longer a dump, it is a sanitary 
landfill and the rules are different. On a voice vote, two voters were against. 
On a hand count, the vote was 298 in the affirmative, 5 in the negative. Motion 
carried. 

31 



Article 4.: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of laying water mains not less than six inches in 
diameter, a distance of 600 feet, more or less, along Crestwood Road, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Edwin Damon moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $18,000. to lay water mains, not less than six inches in diameter, 
along Crestwood Road, a distance of six hundred feet more or less. Seconded. 
Mr. Damon asked that we correct an intolerable health and safety problem; the 
one inch water pipe on Crestwood Road was laid twenty years ago. Often 
times there is no pressure at all. The Finance Committee recommended. Paul 
Gahm suggested that the Town look into other streets that have no Town water 
at all. Bruce Barrett of Charlotte Road, suggested that a four inch pipe be 
used, saving a considerable amount of money. Mr. Damon replied that a four 
inch pipe is substandard and would not supply the water needed. Mrs. Kay 
Waz, whose son lives on Crestwood Road, stated that they were unable to 
flush the toilet at times. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

A motion was made that the meeting adjourn. Seconded. Unanimous voice 
vote. The meeting stood ajourned at 8:50 p.m. 



ATTEST: 



Harold G. Comeau 
Town Clerk 



32 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL NOVEMBER 29, 1976 

ESSEX SS. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby directed 
to notify the Inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town 
affairs, to meet at the IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, in said Ipswich on 

MONDAY, THE TWENTY NINTH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 1976 
at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the following articles, 
viz: 

Moderator Harold Shively called the meeting to order at 7:30 p.m. with the 
announcement that a quorum was present (349 needed, 350 present; the final 
count was 515), and that the Town Clerk affirmed the posting of the Warrant. 
Following the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag, Selectmen Chairman Joh 
Pickard moved that non-voters be allowed into the hall to watch the 
proceedings. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

The Moderator appointed the following tellers: Deanna Cross, Margaret 
Broekel, Sheila Beyer, Dr. Edward Marsh, Mark Hayes, and John Griffin. 

Article 1.: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
purchase and/or repair a fence bounding the property of Elizabeth T. Hulbert, 
Arthur & Mildred Hulbert, and Douglas G. Hulbert, from Town Farm Road 
southerly along Fowlers Lane, a distance of 900 feet more or less, as required 
by agreement with Town conveying parcel of land necessary for construction 
of a roadway from Town Farm Road to the Sewage Disposal Plant of the Town 
of Ipswich, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Edwin Damon, Jr. moved that the Town vote to appropriate the 
sum of $2,200. from available funds in the Treasury (free cash) to purchase and 
repair a fence bounding the property of Elizabeth Tl Hulbert, Arthur and 
Mildred Hulbert, and Douglas G. Hulbert from Town Farm Road southerly 
along Fowler's Lane, a distance of 900 feet more or less, as required by 
agreement with the Town, conveying parcel of land necessary for construction 
of a roadway from Town Farm Road to the Sewage Disposal Plant of the Town 
of Ipswich. Seconded. Mr. Damon explained that this Agreement was made 
with the Hulbert family in the late 1950's and these funds will upgrade and 
repair the fence. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

Article 2.: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the transfer of the Library 
Building Trust Fund to the Library Trustees for the purpose of planning and 
design of an addition to the Town Library, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectman Adele C. Robertson moved that the Town vote to authorize the 
transfer of $26,200. from the Library Building Trust Fund to the Library 
Trustees for the purpose of planning and design of an addition to the Town 
Library. Also that the Town approve the application to EDA under Title I of 
the Public Works Act of 1976, by the Town, for improvement and expansion of 
its Public Library, and the Town hereby authorizes the expenditure of any 
funds received from the Federal Government in connection therewith. 
Seconded. Mrs. Robertson stated that the Library has been trying to get funds 
for an addition for 15 years, and now has a good chance at a federal grant of 

33 



$729,000. which will double the size of the present building and modernize the 
facilities, adding rooms for special activities, ramps and an elevator for the 
elderly and handicapped. The Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. The motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

Article 3.: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to the 
Fire Budget Account, 220-7-29, Forestry Tanker, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

The Rev. Merle Pimentel moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum 
of $6,000. from available funds in the Treasure (free cash) to the Fire 
Department Budget-Forestry Tanker, to supplement Fire Department Budget 
Account 220-7-29, appropriated at the 1976 Annual Town Meeting. Seconded. 
These additional funds will make it possible to purchase a truck that will be 
able to be used for more purposes, and will save wear and tear on the larger, 
more expensive fire trucks. The Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 4.: To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 40, Section 6B. of 
the General Laws, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, authorizing a clothing 
allowance for the Shellfish Constagle, or take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town vote to accept Chapter 40, Section 6B of 
the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, authorizing the 
Town to appropriate money for the purchase of uniforms, rubber boots, shoes 
and other clothing for the Shellfish Constable. Seconded. Mr. Pickard stated 
that this article would not cost the Town any money. Chairman Charles Dalton 
stated that the Finance Committee was unanimously against this article, that 
we would be accepting a permissive State statute which in the future might 
cost us for something we did not want. Further, the Finance Committee was 
under the impression that Shellfish Constable Sheppard did not wish a uniform. 
Mr. Pickard said that the article had been pushed on him over the past week, 
he didn't really care but asked Mr. Sheppard to state his feelings. Mr. 
Sheppard was not present. The motion was defeated on a voice vote. 

Article 5.: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money, in 
addition to the sum of money appropriated at the 1976 Annual Town Meeting, 
to the Fire Budget to pay Ipswich Firefighters for Overtime Worked in fiscal 
1975, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $2,165.70 
from available funds in the Treasure (free cash) in addition to the sum of 
money appropriated at the 1976 Annual Town Meeting to the Fire Budget to 
pay Ipswich firefighters for overtimed worked in fiscal 1975. Seconded. The 
motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

Article 6.: To see what action the Town will take relative to transfer of funds 
from Consultant's Reimbursable (line item #114-2-91) to Consultant's General 
(line item #114-2-92) or to see what other action the Town might take relative 
thereto. 

Planning Board Chairman George Hayes moved that the Town authorize the 
transfer of the sum of S8,500. form Consultant's Reimbursable (line item 
114-2-91) to Consultant's General (line item 114-2-92) in the Town of Ipswich 
Planning Board budget for the fiscal year 1976/77. Seconded. Mr. Hayes 
explained that this sum was originally budgeted for the PCD project which now 
appears to be further delayed, and will be used to pay Metcalf & Eddy for 

34 



work on updating the Zoning By-law and past work done on the PCD report. 
The Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. The 
motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

Mr. Pickard moved that Articles 9 and 10 be taken out of context. Seconded. 
He wished to have these two most important articles considered before the 
quorum was lost. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 7.: To see what action the Town will take in regard to proposed changes 
to Section II, unnumbered Paragraphs 1 and 2 of the Town of Ipswich 
Protective Zoning By-Law relating to Non-vonforming Uses. 

Planning Board member Jason Sokolov moved to amend Section II of the 
Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich by deleting the word 
"abandoned" from the first sentence of unnumbered paragraph one of said 
Section II and, in substitution therefor, inserting the word "discontinued" so 
that, as amended, that sentence shall read: 

"Any lawful building or structure or use of a building, structure or land, or 
part thereof existing at the time this By-Law is adopted may be continued 
although such building, or use of building or land does not conform to the 
provisions of the district in which it is located, provided such use has not been 
discontinued for a period of one (1) year, except in the case of land used for 
agriculture, horticulture, or floriculture where such non-use of non-conforming 
uses of land, buildings, or structures shall have existed for a period of less than 
five (5) years." 

And by deleting the second unnumbered paragraph of said Section II in its 
entirety and in place thereof inserting the following paragraph: 

"As to any non-conforming use which has not been discontinued as provided 
above and when approved by the Board of Appeals, the use of any 
non-conforming building, structure or land may be changed to a use otherwise 
permitted in this by-law but such changed use shall not be approved if it is 
found to be more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing 
non-conforming used by reason of, but not limited to, any increase in traffic, 
dirt, dust, glare, odor, fumes, smoke, gas, sewage, refuse, noise, vibration, 
danger of explosion or fire, residential population density or building size." 

Seconded. Mr. Sokolov gave a couple of examples of what these changes 
will mean, and explained that the word "abandoned" had been a poor choice, 
its meaning not being clear, and the Planning Board felt that "discontinued" 
was a better one. The second change will clarify the procedure for changing 
from one non-conforming use to another. The Planning Board, Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended this article. Cornelius Cleary 
spoke in favor. With a two-thirds vote necessary, the motion passed 467 to 7. 

Article 8.: To see what action the Town will take in regard to proposed changes 
to Section VI, Paragraph A of the Town of Ipswich Protective Zoning By-Law 
relating to lot size and building requirements in the Summer Residence district. 

Planning Board member John Beagan moved to amend the Table of Lot and 
Building Requirements in Subsection A, Section VI of the Protective Zoning 
By-Law of the Town of Ipswich by substituing the figure 43,560 for the firgure 
18,000 in the column designated Minimum Lot Area (square feet) and the figure 
175 for the figure 125 in the column Minimum Lot Width (FT) (A); both of the 
aforesaid substitutions applicable to the Summer Residence (SR) District. 

35 



Seconded. This article had been brought to the Planning Board by the Great 
Neck Association, over 90% of which is in favor of the change. The Planning 
Board by a vote of 3-1, with one abstention, decided to bring it before the 
Special Town Meeting rather than wait to complete the Zoning By-Law 
revision. The Board of Selectment unanimously recommended; the Finance 
Committee 7-0, with one abstention. Walter Mott, a resident of the Neck and 
member of the Association, explained that at the Annual Town Meeting when a 
sewerage study of the Neck area was proposed, the Association agreed to it if 
rezoning was also considered. The Association worked with both the Planning 
Board and the Conservation Commission over the summer months to formulate 
a draft, held open meetings to get opinions, and made sure all year-round 
residents received a copy of the draft. Attorney Paul Gillespie representing the 
Proprietors of the Great Neck, asked that Article 8 be indefinitely postponed. 
Seconded. Mr. Gillespie felt the article had many features of eminent domain; 
certain valuable rights are going to be taken away, one of which is the right to 
develop land. The Proprietors ask that an orderly process take place and a land 
use study be made. Zoning means the best use of land for everybody. Albert 
Howes, Chairman of the Civic Committee of the Great Neck Association, 
stated that 60-70% of the Town is already zoned for one acre lots. He listed the 
undeveloped land amounts in Jeffrey's Neck and Great Neck and said that 
continuing with. 18, 000 square foot lots would mean more than 500 people over 
the one acre lots. The Proprietors previously had stated that they sold land by 
the foot, consequently the total lot size made no difference; now they feel it 
does. The Proprietors had acquired the former grazing land for a comparatively 
small amount of money. On the motion to indefinitely postpone, the motion 
was defeated on a voice vote. 

A two-thirds vote was necessary on the original motion. The motion carried 
with 457 voting in the affirmative, 21 in the negative. 

A motion to adjourn was seconded and carried by unanimous voice vote. 
The meeting adjourned at 8:55 p.m. 

ATTEST: 

Harold G. Comeau 
Town Clerk 

Artile 9.: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
explore and test possible water well locations within the Town, and to raise 
said appropriation by transfer of available funds in the Treasury, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town appropriate the sum of $38,000. from 
Water Department surplus to explore and test possible water welll locations 
with the Town. Seconded. Mr. Pickard read a letter received from the Director 
of the Department of Environmental Quality Engineering, declaring a water 
emergency under Chapter 40, Section 41 A of the General Laws, and stating 
that it had been concerned for many years with the quality as well as the 
quantity of water in Ipswich. The Finance Committee, Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended. Paul Gahm felt this would be only a temporary 
solution and urged defeat. Mrs. Robertson spoke in favor. The motion carried 
on a voice vote. 

Article 10.: To see if the town will appropriate a sum of money for the 
development of additional well fields and for wells; to determine whether such 
appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

36 



And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up attested copies 
thereof, one at the Post Office, one at the Town House and one at each of the 
meeting houses and by publication, seven days at least prior to the time for 
holding said meeting, in a newspaper published in, or having a general 
circulation in the Town of Ipswich. Given unto our hands this Tenth Day of 
November in the year of the Lord, One Thousand Nine Hundred and Seventy 
Six. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sume of $75,000. 
for the development of additional well fields and for wells; and to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
authorized to issue bonds or notes in the amount of $75,000. under Chapter 44, 
Section 8 (5) of the General Laws, as amended. Seconded. A new well-digging 
outfit has been hired and it is hoped to put a producing well on the line shortly. 
The Board of Selectmen, the Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
In answer to a question from the floor as to what the Town is doing in regard 
to a permanent water solution, Mr. Pickard said that the Board was working on 
several different solutions and hoped to come in to the Annual Town Meeting 
in May with something concrete. With a two-thirds vote necessary, the motion 
carried with 438 voting in the affirmative and 17 in the negative. 



37 



(House of Hinlin photo) 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

(7 to r) Merle R. Pimentel; Edwin H. Damon, John M. Pickard, 
Chairman; Adele C. Robertson; Charles K. Cobb, Jr. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



During this past year the Board has acquired a new chairman, and the town 
has a new town manager and a new town engineer. The impact of these latter 
two appointments will not be felt until 1977, but the Board has every 
confidence that the results will be beneficial to the town. 

The perpetual problems of an inadequate water supply, the necessity for 
improvement of sewer services, and control of land usage in town are still with 
us. During the past year the Board has specifically directed its efforts to finding 
a solution to the water situation. Exploration of the town's groundwater 
resources continues and we are hopeful that additional water supplies will be 
available from groundwells during the coming summer months to eke out our 
present limited supplies. At best this is purely a short term solution, however, 
and in an effort to provide a solution to the long term problem the Board has 
directed the town engineer to obtain current prices for previously discussed 
options — including a new reservoir. The Board is very much aware of the fact 
that the citizens have previously turned down these options. However, if the 
citizens wish to continue using water at the present rate of consumption, and if 
they wish to avoid the continual water emergency bans, and the necessity of 
buying water from neighboring communities, the Board feels these options 
must be immediately re-examined, and a decision reached as soon as possible. ■ 

The Board is pleased to report that the municipal wastewater treatment plant 
on Town Farm Road is completed and is being utilized, subject to final 
checking and official acceptance. 

38 




(House of Hinlin photo) 



TOWN MANAGER 

Joseph McD. Mitchell 

Shortly after Thanksgiving, Mrs. Mitchell and I made Ipswich our home. We 
hope that we will be "permanent residents", contrary to the record to date. 

We are both delighted to return to the Northeast, as well as to New England, 
which was our home once, as well as the home of one of my principle 
ancestors, William Sprague, who was a Selectman and later Constable in 
Hingham, circa 1645. While we were welcomed by cold blasts of arctic air and 
tons of snow, you welcomed us with kind hearts and warm hearths. We both 
hope to earn your respect and good will as the years go by. 

Your Friend, 

Joseph McD. Mitchell 

39 




DEPARTMENT HEADS 



{House of Hinlin photo) 



(Bottom row I to r) Harold G. Comeau, Town Clerk; Charles C. Dalton, 
Town Counsel; James H. Daly, Recreation-Parks Director; Pete George, 
Harbormaster; George C. Mourikas, Treasurer/Collector; Alfred Tobiasz, 
Electric Manager; Edwin N. Bronk, Health Agent; (top row I to r) Frank 
Story, Veteran's Agent; Armand T. Michaud, Public Works Director; 
Cathleen McGinley, Youth Director; Eleanor Crowley, Librarian; John B. 
Macken, Dog Officer; Varnum Pedrick, Assessor; Ralph Hebert, Building 
Inspector; Robert H. Leet, Accountant; £rmand Brouillette, Police 
Chief; Walter H. Hulbert, Jr., Cemetery Superintendent; James E. 
Chase, Engineer. (Fire Chief Theodore Mozdziez was on sick leave when 
this picture was taken.) 







il r. ; } Pip 










DRY GULCH'' 

Dow's Reservoir 



(Photo by Ipswich cronicle) 



40 



ASSESSOR'S OFFICE 

Varnum S. Pedrick, Chief Assessor 



The total assessed value of real estate and personal property committed to 
the Treasurer for collection was $73,948,067. The total is an increase of 
approximately $900,000 over 1975. The modest increase of $4.00 on our tax 
rate was much less than the majority of Massachusetts' communities, and was 
a pleasant surprise to many people who had anticipated a much greater rise in 
taxes. 

We also committed $432,811 in motor vehicle excise taxes which is a slight 
decrease over the previous year. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Ralph Hebert 

Construction was on the upswing for 1976, which includes thirty new 
dwellings. The bulk of the Construction Valuation, however, was due to the 
home for the elderly and low-income housing by the Ipswich Housing 
Authority. 

Frequency of Court appearances increased due to zoning and building code 
violations. 



Construction Valuation 

Fees Collected 
Building Permits 
Occupancy Permits 
Certificates of Inspection 

Total Fees Collected 

Building Permits Issued 

(New Construction, Misc. Construction, Additions, Remodeling, Demolition, 
Signs, Pools and wSiding) 



1976 
$3,231,164 


1975 

$1,575,570 


4,448 
138 
925 


3,504 
142 

425 


$5,511 


$4,071 


244 


229 



41 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

Walter H. Hulhert, Jr., Superintendent 

There were 92 interments in 1976 compared to 86 in 1975; with a yearly 
average of 119 over the last five years. 

Three single graves; five, two grave lots; four, four grave lots and two, eight 
grave lots were sold with perpetual care. Five, two grave lots; four, four grave 
lots and one single grave were awarded by the American Legion in the 
Veteran's Cemetery to Veterans and their families, with no revenue for care of 
these lots. 

Forty five monument and marker foundations were laid and twelve sets of lot 
bounds were set. Fifteen Government Veteran head markers were set. 

A stone retainer wall was installed at the end of the new cemetery building. 
The office end and front of the building was landscaped. 

General groundskeeping in all cemetaries included repairing and raising 
winter graves and settled graves in the older cemeteries. Repairing water lines. 

Re-serviced two avenues in Locust Grove cemetery using two hundred fifty 
tons of hot top. 

Purchased a new one ton Ford dump truck, replacing a 1968 International 
dump. General repair and maintenance of all grounds' equipment. 

All Cemetery records were microfilmed up to date to protect us in case of 
loss. 

Monies collected for FY 1976 as follows: 

Interment Openings $ 6,339.00 

Foundations & Bounds 1,122.00 

New lots & Graves 1,610.00 

Perpetual Care Income 14,300.96 

Perpetual Flower Fund Income 514.53 

Annual Care 375.00 

Chapel tent rentals 465.00 

New Perpetual Care Deposits 2,260.00 

$26,986.49 



I 



42 







Owen L. Clarke 

CoMM ISSIONER 

Director of Accounts 



tn*eaa/ 



aSevwett' <seufortita/& &u/'teu'fija'. cf&vevnfnenl' vente* 
January 2U, 1977 



MAIL ADDRESS: 

P. 0. BOX 7015 

BOSTON. MASS. 02204 



To the Board of Selectmen 

Mr. John M. Pickard, Chairman 
Ipswich, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books and accounts of 
the town of Ipswich for the period from July 1, 197U to October 3, 197i>, made in 
accordance with the provisions of Chapter Mi, General Laws. This is in the form 
of a report made to my by Mr. Harold J Regan, Jr., Chief Municipal and County 
Examiner. 



Very truly yours, 




ir'ector of Accounts 




V- 



rmcrmcv 



Mr. Robert M. Crosby 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

Boston, Massachusetts 



Sir: 



As directed by you, I have made an audit of the books and accounts of the 
town of Ipswich for the period from July 1, 197U to October 3, 1975, the following 
report being submitted thereon: 

The financial transactions, as recorded on the books of the several 
departments receiving or disbursing money for the town or comnitting bills for 
collection, were examined and checked by comoarison with the books of the town 
accountant and the town treasurer. 

The books and accounts in the town accountant's office were examined and 
checked. The town accountant's ledgers for fiscal 1975 and for the period from 
July 1 to October 3, 1975 were analyzed. The recorded receipts were compared with 
the treasurer's books and with the departmental record of payments to the treasurer, 
while the recorded disbursements were checked with the treasury warrants and with the 
records of payments by the treasurer. The appropriations, loan authorizations, and 
transfers, as entered on the ledgers, were checked with the town clerk's records of 
financial votes passed by town meetings and with the finance committee's authorizations 
of transfers from the reserve fundo 

A trial balance was taken off, and a balance sheet, which is appended to 
this report, was prepared showing the financial condition of the town as of 
October 3, 1975. 

The balance sheet shows three overdrawn appropriations totaling 33,501.10, 
which are contrary to the provisions of Section 31, Chapter bh f General Laws. 

The books and accounts in the office of the town treasurer were examined 



and checked in detail. The receipts, as recorded, were analyzed and compared with the 
town accountant's books, with the records of payments to the treasurer by the several 
departments collecting money for the town, and with other sources from which the town 
received money, while the recorded payments were compared with the treasury warrants 
and with the town accountant's books. 

The cash balance on October 3, 1975 was verified by reconciliation of the 
bank balances with statements furnished by the banks of deposit, by inspection of 
the savings bank books, by verification of the certificates of deposit, and by actual 
count of the cash in the office. 

The Federal Revenue Sharing Funds were examined and checked. The funds 
received from the Federal Government were listed, the income was proved, and the 
appropriations were checked with the town clerk's record of town meetings. The 
payments were compared with the selectmen's warrants authorizing the disbursement of 
Federal Revenue Sharing Funds and with the town accountant's records. The cash 
balance on October 3, 1975 was proved by reconciliation of the bank balance with a 
statement furnished by the bank of deposit and by verification of the certificates 
of deposit. 

The reported payments on account of maturing debt and interest were compared 
with the amounts falling due and checked with the cancelled coupons and securities on 
file. The outstanding bonds and coupons were listed and reconciled with statements 
furnished by the banks of deposit. 

The transactions of the several trust and investment funds in the custody 
of the town treasurer, the treasurer of the library trustees, and the trustees of 
the Manning School Fund, the Brown School Fund, and the Burley Education Fund, as 
well as the Feoffees of the Grammar Schools of Ipswich, were verified. The 
securities and savings bank books representing the investment of these funds were 
examined and listed, and the balances were compared with the town accountant's books. 

The treasurer's records of tax titles and tax possessions held by the town 



were examined and checked. The taxes and assessments transferred to the tax title 
account were coinpared with the town collector's books, the recorded redemptions were 
checked with the treasurer's cash book, and the tax titles and tax possessions on 
hand were listed, reconciled with the ledger controls, and compared with the records 
at the Registry of Deeds. 

The deductions from employees' salaries for Blue Cross and Blue Shield, and 
for group insurance were listed and reconciled with the amounts due and paid to the 
proper agencies. 

It was noted that receipts from payroll deductions on account of Federal 
and State taxes and the county retirement system had not been entered in the cash 
book, the payments to the various agencies having been made directly from the payroll 
vouchers. It is recommended that the deductions be entered as receipts in the cash 
book and that payments to the various agencies be made on authority of the treasury 
warrants, in order that the accountant's ledger may show all the financial transactions 
and cash balances. 

The books and accounts of the town collector were examined and checked. The 
tax, excise, assessment, departmental, and water accounts outstanding July 1, 197h f 
as well as all subsequent commitments, were audited and proved. The cash books we ye 
footed and the recorded collections were checked with the payments to the treasurer. 
The abatements were compared with the assessors' and other departmental records of 
abatements granted, the amounts transferred to the tax title account were verified, and 
the outstanding accounts were listed and reconciled with the respective accounts in 
the accountant's ledger. 

It is recommended that the town collector make a determined effort to effect 
a settlement of past due taxes which date back to 1966, as well as past due motor 
vehicle excise which date back to 196U« 

The records of apportioned sewer assessments were examined and checked. The 



payments in advance were checked with the treasurer's recorded receipts, the abatements 
were compared with the assessors' records of abatements granted, the amounts added to 
taxes were checked with the town collector's books, and the apportionments due in 
future years, as well as the suspended assessments, were listed and reconciled with 
the respective ledger accounts. 

The books and accounts of the municipal light department were examined and 
checked. The recorded collections were compared with the payments to the treasurer, 
the abatements and discounts were verified, and the outstanding accounts were listed. 

The records of municipal light consumers' deposits were examined and checked. 
The refunds were verified, and the deposits on hand were listed and proved. 

The outstanding tax, excise, assessment, departmental, municipal light, and 
water accounts were verified by mailing notices to a number of persons whose names 
appeared on the books as owing money to the town, and from the replies received 
thereto it appears that the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

The financial records of the town clerk were examined and checked in details 
The collections on account of dog and sporting licenses issued, as well as for marriage 
intentions, recording fees, etc., were checked, and the payments to the treasurer and 
to the Division of Fisheries and Game were verified. 

The records of cash receipts by the board of selectmen, the sealer of weights 
and measures, and the inspectors of buildings, plumbing, and gas, as well as by the 
police, health, recreation, school, and cemetery departments, and by all other 
departments collecting money for the town, were examined and checked. The payments 
to the treasurer were verified, and the cash balances, including petty cash advances, 
were verified by actual count of the cash on hand in the several departments. 

The books and accounts of the treasurer of the Eastern Essex Veterans' 
Services District were examined in conjunction with the audit of the town treasurer's 
accounts. The recorded receipts were analyzed and verified by comparison with the 



amounts paid by the member towns of the district. The payments, as entered, were 
checked with the approved warrants authorising the disbursement of district funds, 
and the cash balance on October 3, 1915 was proved by reconciliation of the bank 
balance with a statement furnished by the bank of deposit. 

The surety bonds of the officials required by law to furnish them for the 
faithful performance of their duties were examined and found to be in proper form. 

In addition to the balance sheet, there are aopended to this report tables 
showing a reconciliation of the tovm treasurer's cash, summaries of the tax, excise, 
assessment, tax title, tax possession, departmental, municipal light, and water 
accounts, as well as schedules showing the condition and transactions of the several 
trust and investment funds. 

For the cooperation received from all town officials while engaged in 
making the audit, I wish, on behalf of my assistants and for myself, to express 
appreciation o 




County Fxaminer 
hjrtmcv 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1976 



ASSETS 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



CASH 






TEMPORARY LOANS 




General 




381,039.20 


Anticipation Fed-Aided P.W.Proj. 


114,400.00 


Revenue 


Sharing 


(1,882.37) 






Petty 






AGENCY 




Account 


:ing 


5.00 


Group Insurance Deductions 


17,827.60 


Schools 




260.00 


Tax-Sheltered Annuities 


3,917.97 


Electric 


275.00 


Excess Sale-Land of Low Value 


717.32 


Librarj 


r 


60.00 


Uniform Deductions 


(87.77) 


Advance 


22,375.12 


Workmen's Compensation 


270.00 


GUARANTEE DEPOSITS 








380,026.83 


Bid & Performance Deposit 




CERTIFICATE 




Heartbreak 


7 , 000 . 00 


Revenue 




1,437,375.07 


Meadowbrook 


3,686.74 


Revenue 


Sharing 


250,000.00 


Electric Meters 


14,045.00 






1,687,375.07 


Electric Meter Income 


7,246.79 


ACCOUNTS 


RECEIVABLE 






31,978.53 


Taxes 






TAILINGS 




Personal Property 




Unclaimed Checks 


7,816.77 


Levy c 


»f 1966 


3.30 






Levy c 


>f 1967 


56.25 


TRUST & INVESTMENT FUNDS 




Levy c 


»f 1969 


110.40 


Cemetery Perpetual Care Bequests 


180.00 


Levy c 


>f 1970 


278.60 


Conservation Fund 


32,340.17 


Levy c 


»f 1971 


310.80 




32,520.17 


Levy c 


>f 1972 


358 . 40 


FEDERAL GRANTS 




Levy c 


>f 1973 


2,208.25 


Schools 




Levy c 


>f 1974 


144.38 


Title I 


398.02 


Levy c 


»f 1975 


3,453.24 


Title II 


4.87 


Levy c 


>f 1976 


12,586.68 


Title III 


2,119.72 


Real Estate 




Title IV 


25.00 


Levy c 


>f 1972 


66.08 


Title IVk 


3,424.19 


Levy c 


>f 1973/74 


2,145.94 


Title VIB 


104.55 


Levy c 


>f 1974/75 


19,713.04 


Title VIB 


1,129.48 


Levy c 


>f 1975/76 


147,109.09 


General 








188,544.45 


Revenue Sharing 


248,117.63 


Excise 






Title VII 


2.15 


Motor 


Vehicles 






255,325.61 


Levy 


of 1964 


1,560.38 


STATE GRANTS 




Levy 


of 1965 


2,801.31 


Bicentennial (Historical) 


85.05 


Levy 


of 1966 


290.41 


Mass. Shellfish Propagation 


7,965.76 


Levy 


of 1967 


1,333.02 




8,050.81 


Levy 


of 1968 


382.49 


OTHER GRANTS 




Levy 


of 1969 


171.94 


Heritage Trust 


2,084.82 


Levy 


of 1970 


1,089.72 






Levy 


of 1971 


1,237.88 


APPROPRIATION BALANCE 




Levy 


of 1972 


6,775.87 


General 


7,471,974.63 


Levy 


of 1973 


16,120.07 


Revenue Sharing 


280,000.00 


Levy 


of 1974 


26,435.62 




7,751,974.63 


Levy 


of 1975 


37,938.41 






Levy 


of 1976 


155,095.10 
251,232.22 







TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1976 



ASSETS 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Farm Animals 






UTILITY BALANCES 




Levy of 1973 




20.00 


Electric 




Levy of 1975 




20.00 


Maintenance & Operation 


29,155.82 


Levy of 1976 




32.50 


Depreciation 


120,361.19 






72.50 


Construction 


1,912.61 


Special 






Building Construction 


5,213.06 


In Litigation 








156,642.68 


Levy of 1970 




287.66 


Water 




Levy of 1971 




287.25 


Maint. & Operation (approp. ) 


271,910.00 


Levy of 1972 




286.84 


Construction 




Levy of 1973 




215.10 


Dow's Reservoir 


516.69 


Levy of 1974 




201.29 


1969 


430.71 




1 


,278.14 


1970 


5,556.39 


Tax Titles & Possessions 






1971 


1,395.55 


Tax Titles 


38 


,325.07 


1973 


29,713.34 


Tax Possessions 


7 


,809.28 


1976 


12,273.87 




46 


,134.35 


Plant & Investment 


48,927.40 


Special Assessments 








370,723.95 


Unapportioned Sewer 




900.00 


LOANS AUTHORIZED & UNISSUED 


975,400.00 


Added to Taxes 










Levy of 1973 




23.40 


OVERESTIMATES 1976 




Levy of 1975 




172.22 


County Tax 


50,693.52 


Levy of 1976 




366.80 


Special Education 


2,472.00 


Apportioned Paid in Advance 




(93.08) 


Metropolitan Air Pollution Cont. 


260.39 


Committed Interest 






Ipswich River Watershed 


1,204.96 


Levy of 1973 




23.87 




54,630.87 


Levy of 1975 




92.72 


OVERLAY SURPLUS 


136,394.42 


Levy of 1976 




317.44 






* 


1, 


,803.37 


OVERLAY 




Departmental 






Levy of 1967 


56.25 


Town Property 




100.00 


Levy of 1969 


110.40 


Engineering 




45.00 


Levy of 1970 


278.60 


Health 




172.14 


Levy of 1971 


310.80 


Veterans 


54 : 


,687.80 


Levy of 1972 


421.12 


Highway Machinery 




690.62 


Levy of 1973/74 


13,837.54 


Cemetery 




156.00 


Levy of 1974/75 


6,384.62 


Education 




449.20 


Levy of 1975/76 


36,348.61 




56 


,300.76 




57,747.94 


Municipal Electric 






REVENUE RESERVED UNTIL COLLECTED 




Rates & Charges 


273 : 


,496.11 


Motor Vehicle Excise 


251,232.22 


Municipal Water 






Farm Animal Excise 


72.50 


Rates tSt Charges 


67 : 


,122.81 


Special Assessments 


1,803.37 


Liens Added to Taxes 






Special Taxes 


1,278.14 


Levy of 1971 




162.63 


Tax Title & Possession 


46,134.35 


Levy of 1972 




215.97 


Departmental 


56,300.76 


Levy of 1973 




86.55 


Electric 


273,496.11 


Levy of 1975 




300.26 


Water 


69,134.67 


Levy of 1976 


1. 


, 246 . 45 


Sewer 


26,132.55 




69, 


,134.67 


Aid to Highways 
Fed-Aided P. W. Projects 


86,690.00 

398,900.00 

1,211,174.67 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 





BALANCE SHEET - 


JUNE 30,1976 




ASSETS 




LIABILITIES & RESERVES 




Municipal Sewer 




RESERVED FOR PETTY CASH ADVANCE 


600.00 


Rates & Charges 


25,987.20 






Liens Added to Taxes 




SURPLUS REVENUE 




Levy of 1971 


23.52 


General 


478,878.37 


Levy of 1972 


20.35 


Municipal Electric 


57,866.30 


Levy of 1973 


19.29 


Municipal Water 


38,050.83 


Levy of 1976 


82.19 


Municipal Sewer 


50,153.66 




26,132.55 




624,949.16 


Aid to Highways 




RESERVED FOR APPROPRIATION 




Stite 


68,010.00 


Sale of Cemetery Lots 


11,954.95 


County 


18,680.00 


Water Pollution Control 


3,270.00 




86,690.00 


County Dog Refund 


3,064.39 


Fed-Aided P. W. Project 


513,300.00 




18,289.34 


Due from Revenue Sharing 


280,000.00 


REVOLVING 








Cafeteria 


1,392.48 


REVENUE 1976/77 


6,999,389.44 


Athletics 


1,840.01 






Police 


24.00 


LOANS AUTHORIZED 




Historical 


1,065.93 


Sewer 3/7/66 


343,000.00 




4,322.42 


Water 3/5/73 


160,000.00 






Sewer 3/3/75 


229,400.00 






Water 5/3/76 


28,000.00 






School Remodeling 5/3/76 


150,000.00 






Sewer Construction 5/3/76 


65,000.00 
975,400.00 






COURT JUDGMENT 








Marini & Iori 


500.00 






UNDERESTIMATES 1976 








State Parks & Reservation 


514.85 






Mosquito Control 


76.60 







591.45 



11.837.401.91 



11.837.401.91 



Source: Town Accountant 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1976 

DEBT ACCOUNTS 



NET FUNDED or FIXED DEBT 
Inside 
Outside 
Public Service 



SERIAL LOANS 
743,000.00 Inside Debt Limit 
240,000.00 General 
622,000.00 Sewer Construction 

Payne School Renovation 

Outside Debt Limit 

General 
Sewer Construction 
Public Service 

Electric 

Water 



733,000.00 

10,000.00 

743,000.00 



240,000.00 

297,000.00 
325,000.00 
622,000.00 



1,605,000.00 



1,605,000.00 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



APPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 
NOT DUE 165,747.90 

SUSPENDED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 
NOT DUE 4,430.88 



APPORTIONED SEWER REVENUE DUE 

1976 16,290.29 

1977 14,706.73 

1978 14,404.37 

1979 13,416.98 

1980 12,478.88 

1981 11,824.24 

1982 11,605.22 

1983 9,912.94 

1984 8,279.96 

1985 7,761.05 

1986 7,761.05 

1987 7,260.33 

1988 7,044.44 

1989 6,391.00 

1990 4,990.16 

1991 4,791.78 

1992 3,897.17 

1993 2,572.44 

1994 321.79 

1995 37.08 

165,747.90 



SUSPENDED SEWER REVENUE 



4,430.88 



170,178.78 



170,178.78 



Source: Town Accountant 



10 



CASH & SECURITIES 
In Custody of Treasurer 

In Custody of Trustees 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1976 

TRUST and INVESTMENT FUNDS 



453,866.21 In Custody of Treasurer: 

Animal Fund 
350,704.47 Mrs. William G. Brown 
Cemetery Funds 

Perpetual Care 

Flower Fund 
Investment Funds 

Stabilization 
Library Funds 

John C. Kimball 
Park Funds 

Appleton Memorial Fountain 

Martha I. Savory Tree 

Dow Boulder 
School Funds 

R. T. Crane Picnic 

Eunice C. Cowles 

Mark Newman 

Marianna T. Jones 



In Custody of Trustees: 

School Funds 
Bur ley 10/3/75 
Brown 10/3/75 
Manning 10/3/75 
Feoffees of Grammar School 

Library Funds 
Heard 10/3/75 
Elizabeth Lathrop 10/3/75 
Building 10/3/75 
Memorial Book 10/3/75 
Abbie Newman 10/3/75 
George Spiller 10/3/75 
Treadwell 10/3/75 
Wales Endowment 10/3/75 
Trust Account 10/3/75 



1,253.66 

150,317.81 
10,130.54 

257,220.59 

630.11 

2,011.41 

1,292.38 

468.52 

6,366.64 
10,000.55 
11,352.58 

2,821.42 
453,866.21 



11,899.75 

6,302.17 

99,893.34 

159,281.32 

10,517.94 
1,892.05 

24,995.43 
1,206.73 
5,869.37 
1,812.05 

24,284.26 

299.97 

2,450.09 

350,704.47 



804,570.68 



804,570.68 



Source: Town Accountant 



11 



TAXES 






Local 






Real Estate 


Levy 


of 


1973 


Levy 


of 


1974 


Levy 


of 


1975 


Levy 


of 


1976 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30. 1976 



2,075.36 

4,228.52 

69,409.54 

4,403,531.00 



Personal Property 
Levy of 1975 
Levy of 1976 

Tax Title Redemption 

Farm Animal Excise 
Levy of 1974 
Levy of 1975 

In Lieu of Taxes 
Veterans' Abatement 
State-owned Property 
Housing Authority 
Trustees of Reservations 

State Local Aid 
Lottery 

Chapter 70 School Aid 
Chapter 69 & 71 Special Education 



LICENSES & PERMITS 
Alcoholic Beverages 
Occupancy 
Building 
Shellfish 
Clams 

Common Victualers 
Gas 

Plumbing 
Septic Tanks 
Health 

Marriage Licenses 
Street Openings 
Taxis 
Firearms 

License to sell firearms 
Miscellaneous 

FINES & FORFEITS 
Forfeits 
District Court 

Fines 

Restitution 



1,528.74 
113,993.32 



7,152.39 



353.50 
124.00 



4,463.62 

98,703.25 

864.00 

14,682.63 



63,030.46 

517,936.03 

907.00 



18,152.00 

82.00 

2,756.50 

4,450.00 

5,797.50 

82.00 

785.50 

1,430.50 

360.00 

562.50 

420.00 

120.00 

16.00 

490.00 

40.00 

1,356.00 



50.00 

4,526.50 
421.00 



4,479,244.42 



115,522.06 



7,152.39 



477.50 



118,713.50 



581,873.49 



36,900.50 



4,997.50 



12 



973 


1974 


1975 


1976 


115 


121 


107 


127 


140 


138 


124 


115 


137 


123 


138 


127 



VITAL STATISTICS 

Harold G. Comeau, Town Clerk 
Comparative Vital Statistics recorded for the past four years: 



Births 

Deaths 

Marriages 



All the births recorded were to Ipswich residents (male 71, female 56). Of the 
total number of deaths recorded, 80 were residents (male 40, female 40). The 
age of the oldest resident was 95 years, 11 months, 1 day. 

DOG LICENSES 

Males 

Females 

Sprayed Females 

Kennel 

Total 

CLAM PERMITS 

Residents 

Non-residents Daily 
Non-residents Yearly 
Total 

REGISTERED VOTERS (as of December 31, 1976) 

Precinct Democrats Republicans 

I 309 537 

II 582 617 

III 328 435 

IV 524 449 
Total 1743 2038 



ELECTIONS (Town) 

The annual meeting for the election of Town officers was held in accordance 
with the warrant on Monday, May 10, 1976, from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. The 
voting machine in Precinct I registered 456 ballots cast, Precinct II 570 votes 
cast, III 323 votes cast, and IV, 699 votes cast for a total of 2,048 votes cast 
for the four precincts. 





1975 


1976 




790 


688 




97 


54 




610 


537 




12 


14 




1509 


1293 




722 


397 




153 


79 




349 


176 


Jnenroll 


1224 
ed 


652 
Total 


618 




1464 


898 




2097 


747 




1510 


924 




1897 


3187 




6968 



MODERATOR 
Harold E. Shively 
Blank 

SELECTMEN 
John M. Pickard 
Leon Haserlat 
Blank 



Prec 


Prec 


Prec 


Prec 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 




360 


447 


251 


505 


1563 


96 


123 


72 


194 


485 


343 


389 


239 


458 


1429 


77 


129 


68 


192 


466 


36 


52 


16 


49 


153 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1976 

DEPARTMENTAL 
General Government 

Selectmen 
Liquor ID 54.00 

Accountant 
Group Insurance 1,850.00 

Casualty Insurance 22,179.20 

Workmen's Compensation 28,461.00 

Retirement 8,075.00 

Treasurer 
Tax Title Costs 10.00 

Cost - Taxes 342.00 

Cost - Motor Vehicle Excise 1,241.00 

Tax Certificates 1,550.00 

Town Clerk 
Recordings 719.00 

' Certified Copies 914.00 

All Others 344.10 

Planning Board 
Filing Fees 30.00 

Board of Appeals 
Hearing Fees 

Conservation Commission 

Certificates of Inspection 

Historical Commission 
Sale of Booklets 

Public Safety 
Police 

Photocopies 

Special Duties 

Bicycle Registration 

Firearms Identification 
Forestry 

Sealer of Weights 
Dog Officer 

Health & Sanitation 
Health 

Recycling 

Immunization 
Sanitation 

Sewer Connection fees 

Sewer Rental 

Sewer Rental Liens (1976) 

Highways 
Chapter 90 

State 

County 
Miscellaneous 



689.00 

50.00 

650.00 








1,388.66 










68, 


546, 


,96 


697.00 
15,899.50 

34.75 
414.00 
636.09 
104.20 

14.00 










17, 


,799, 


,54 


1,728.31 
154.00 








510.00 

29,175.66 

1,000.88 










32, 


,568, 


.85 


40,670.00 

19,500.00 

35.00 










60, 


,205, 


,00 



13 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASK RECEIPTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1976 



GRANTS & GIFTS 
Federal Revenue Sharing 

Entitlements 
Federal Grants 

ESEA Title I 

ESEA Title II 

ESEA Title III 

ESEA Title IV 

ESEA Title VIB 

ESEA Title VII HUD 

Public Works Project 

State Grants 
School Transportation 
Vocational Education 
Food Service (Lunches) 
School Building Assistance 
Transportation of Handicapped 
Regional School Reimbursement 
Special Education (Chapter 766) 
Water Pollution Control 
Highways 
Library Aid 
Marine Fisheries 
Corp. & Tax Plan Research 
Corp. 6c Tax Reimbursement 
Historical (Bicentennial) 



County Grants 
Dog Fund 

Other Grants 
Feoffees 
Heritage Trust 



26 3,948.00 

32,100.00 

8,954.90 

47,019.72 

125.00 

30,865.00 

11,255.31 

1,575,400.00 



205,690.00 

2,760.53 

79,486.40 

12,953.35 

18,050.82 

51,391.40 

269,619.88 

3,270.00 

122,766.59 

4,031.25 

17,025.00 

5,966.60 

11,383.47 

500.00 



3,064.39 



7,500.00 
2,875.00 



1,969,667.93 



804,895.29 



3,064.39 



10,375.00 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 
Sewer 
Unapportioned 

Apportioned - Paid in Advance 

Added to taxes 

Levy of 1973 

Levy of 1975 

Levy of 1976 



1,533.60 
9,406.26 

195.12 

134.60 

16,593.75 



27,863.33 



PRIVILEGES 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1974 
Levy of 1975 
Levy of 1976 



533.86 

10,199.44 

219,825.06 

143,646.73 



374,205.09 



14 



DEPARTMENTAL (cont.) 
Veterans' Services 

Schools 
Tuition 

Sale of Lunches 
Athletic Receipts 
Telephone 
Driver Education 

Library 
Fines 

Miscellaneous (Lost Books) 
Photocopies 

Recreation 
Beach Stickers 
Swim Program 
Youth Commission 

Unclassified 
Rental Town Property 
Insurance Receipts 
Miscellaneous 
Bicentennial 



PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISES 
Electric 
Rates & Service 

Water 
Sale of Water & Services 
Liens 

Levy of 1973 

Levy of 1974-75 

Levy of 1976 

CEMETERIES 

Sale of Lots & Graves 

Openings 

Tents 

Foundations 

Annual Care 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1976 

38,277.19 



9,274.90 

135,433.67 

7,229.25 

150.64 

2,000.00 



995.34 

135.30 

1,057.90 



2,417.25 

470.00 
1,440.75 



5,238.04 

592.14 

69.00 

155.00 



2,261,705.06 



247,846.95 

52.60 

592.60 

8,734.39 



1,610.00 
6,414.00 

510.00 
1,122.50 

417.00 



38,277.19 



154,088.46 



2,188.54 



4,328.00 



6,054.18 



2,261,705.06 



257,226.54 



10,073.50 



INTEREST 
Electric Meter Deposits 
Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise 
Investment Funds 
Trust .Funds 

Stabilization 

Conservation 

Library 



2,299.64 

8,555.19 

648.61 

72,868.10 

17,945.62 
2,833.04 
2,413.01 



15 




DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1976 



INTEREST (cont.) 
Trust Funds (cont.) 

Cemetery 

Richard T. Crane 

Eunice C. Cowles 

Mark Newman 

Miscellaneous 
Sewer - Paid in Advance 
Sewer - Committed Interest 

Levy of 1973 

Levy of 1975 

Levy of 1976 
Electric Depreciation 
Federal Revenue Sharing 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 
Temporary Loans 

Anticipation Sewer Treatment Serial Loan 
Serial Loans 

Water Well Survey 

AGENCY TRUSTS & INVESTMENTS 
Agency 
Tailings 

Dog Licenses for County 
Electric Meter Deposits 
Payroll Deductions 
Group Insurance 
Tax-Sheltered Annuities 
Uniforms 
Trusts 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Eunice C. Cowles 
Richard T. Crane 
Investments 
General Fund Securities 
Revenue Sharing 

REFUNDS 
General Government 
Public Safety 
Highways 
Veterans 
Schools 
Libraries 

Workmen's Compensation 
Payroll Advance 
Shellfish 
Harbors 
Unclassified 
Electric 
Water 
Revenue Sharing 

TOTAL CASH RECEIPTS 
Source: Town Accountant 



10,069.97 
2,225.74 
697.27 
845.77 
614.66 
322.73 

71.71 

80.09 

10,637.65 

4,232.87 

11,320.33 



1,200,000.00 
50,000.00 



2,954.57 

5,108.05 

11,590.00 

119,644.40 

29,170.52 

1,562.65 

39,039.90 

765.00 

1,208.86 

3,300,000.00 
1,250,000.00 



13,237.69 

42 1 . 2 

76.63 

1,725.30 

2,323.26 

36.50 

4,209.49 

593.51 

3,520.00 

750.00 

938.58 

535.58 

390.64 

368.46 



11 



148,682.00 



1,250,000.00 



4,761,043.95 



42, 176. C 4 
17,649,917.00 



16 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30. 1976 



DEPARTMENTAL EXPENDITURES 
General Appropriation 
Revenue Sharing Appropriation 

FEDERAL GRANTS 
Title I 
II 
III 
IV 
VIB 
VII 

STATE GIANTS 
Youth Commission 
Shellfish Propagation 
Bicentennial (Historical) 

OTHER GRANTS 
Heritage Trust 

PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISE 
Electric 

Operation & Maintenance 

Building Construction 

Construction 

Depreciation Fund 
Water 

Operation & Maintenance (Appropriation) 

Construction (Bond Proceeds) 

Plant & Investment (Appropriation) 

INTEREST 
On Maturing Debt 

General 

Electric 

Water 
Tax Anticipation 

MUNI a PAL INDEBTEDNESS 
Temporary Loans 

Anticipation of Federal Grant 
Serial Loans 

General 

Electric 

Water 

STATE & COUNTY ASSESSMENTS 
State Parks & Reservation 
Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 
Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 
Metropolitan Air Pollution Control 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
Shellfish Purification Plant 



7,914,113.32 
297.151.10 



32,624.44 
3,185.29 
41,658.94 
19,343.70 
16,965.52 
14.483.83 



216.41 

16,719.24 

414.95 



3.564.03 



2,015,138.59 

2,594.90 

381.00 

42,451.36 

159,029.74 
42,133.57 
16.154.16 



61,990.13 

16,614.25 

6,080.00 

12.188.60 



1,085,600.00 

315,000.00 
46,000.00 
55.000.00 



49,429.34 

15,831.84 

1,227.30 

727.21 

1,612.50 

3,496.18 



8,211,264.42 



128,261.72 



17,350.60 



3,564.03 



2,277,883.32 



96,872.98 



1,501,600.00 



17 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1976 



STATE & COUNTY ASSESSMENTS (cont.) 
Ipswich River Watershed 
Mosquito Control 
County Tax 

AGENCY 
Dog Licenses for County 
Veterans' District 
Bid & Performance Deposit 
Group Insurance 
Uniform Deductions 
Tax-Sheltered Annuities Deductions 
Workmen's Compensation Advance 

TRUSTS 
Cemetery 
Perpetual Care Bequests 

Income 
Flower Fund Bequests 

Income 
Conservation Fund 
Other Funds 
Income 
John C. Kimball 
Mrs. William G. Brown 
Mar i anna T. Jones 
Richard T. Crane 
Eunice C. Cowles 
Mark Newman 
Martha I. Savory 
Dow Boulder 
Appleton Memorial 
Library Trust Funds 
Library Building 
Reimbursement Expense 
R. T. Crane Picnic 
Eunice C. Cowles 

INVESTMENT 
Certificates of Deposit 
Revenue 

Federal Revenue Sharing 
Stabilization (income) 

REVOLVING 
Cafeteria 
Athletics 
Police 
Historical 
Theatre Group 



233.06 

23,963.60 

177,106.83 



4,867.05 

14,574.00 

337.00 

113,915.00 

1,614.07 

25,474.08 

270.00 



2,080.00 
11,239.79 

610.08 
84,663.53 



36.64 
93.60 

210.58 
2,225.74 

697.27 

845.77 
96.46 
27.23 

150.15 

2,358.01 

55.00 

1,208.86 
765.00 



3,537,375.07 

1,250,000.00 

17,945.62 



215,136.00 

7,624.01 

15,923.50 

322.73 

111.05 



273,627.86 



161,041.20 



107,373.71 



4,805,320.69 



239,117.29 



18 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1976 

REFUNDS 

Taxes 24,450.30 

Special Assessments 75.78 

Motor Vehicle Excise 7,323.33 
General Departments 

Health & Sanitation 31.01 

Teacher Retirement 41.25 
Public Service 

Electricity 589.32 

Water 544.65 

Meter Deposit 6,725.00 

Meter Deposit Income 425.49 

Health Insurance 74.85 

Accrued Interest 38.88 



40,319.86 



17,863,597.68 



Source: Town Accountant 



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8 



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C IU 111 r-lCUCU rJ CU CU CO 

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ooo ooo 
III II 1 



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CO 
CO 

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37,695. 
1,726. 
2,205. 


66,071. 

7,605. 

11,440. 


cn on on o o on 
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rx. 

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„ ,, * „ NO 

cm m i — cm ■ 



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29 



BURUEY EDUCATION FUND 



BALANCE ON HAND JANUARY 1, 1976: 



$12,794.01 



INCOME FROM FUNDS FOR YEAR 1976 AS FOLLOWS 



Interest - Ipswich Savings Bank $ 51.82 

Interest - Ipswich Savings Bank (Caldwell Fund) 266.11 

Interest - Ipswich Co- Operative 56.16 

Interest - Ipswich Co-Operative Bank - Term Deposit 426.38 

Total Income 



800.47 



EXPENDITURES: 

Patterson Plumbing & Heating Company 
(Modine Heater in Burley School Library) 
David L. Levesque - Electrical work 
on Modine heater 

Total Expenditures 



$656.00 
50.00 



$13,594.48 



706.00 



$12,888.48 



BALANCE ON HAND JANUARY 1, 1977 AS FOLLOWS : 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank 
Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank - Caldwell Fund 
Ipswich Co-Operative Bank - Paid Up Certificate 
Ipswich Co-Operative Bank - Term Deposit 

Total Invested Funds 



$ 864.22 
5,200.71 
1,000.00 
5,823.55 



$12,888.48 



Respectfully submitted, 
BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 

Wilmot E. Hall, Treasurer 



30 



TRUSTEES OF MANNING SCHOOL FUND 

Donald F. Whist on and David C. Williams, Sr. 

MANNING SCHOOL FUNDS 

January 1, 1976 

Balance in Account 7 ^14293, Ipswich Savings Bank 350,769.53 
Balance in Account #7884, Ipswich Savings Bank 25 , 190. 30 

Balance in Account #1995, Ipswich Co-operative Bank 18,452.83 

$94,412.66 

Income from Interest and Dividends 6,161.91 

$100,574.57 
Less Disbursements: 



Rental of Safe Deposit Box $ 8.00 
Supplies for Ipswich High School 3003.57 



3,011.57 



$ 97,563.00 



ASSETS IN FUNDS 
December 31, 1976 

Balance in Account #14293, Ipswich Savings Bank 50,769.53 
Balance in Account #7884, Ipswich Savings Bank 25,190.30 

Balance in Account #1995, Ipswich Co-operative Bank 21,603.17 

697,563.00 

SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 
276 Shares, First National Bank of Boston $2,998.20 
20 Shares, Ipswich Co-operative Bank 4,000.00 



6,998.20 
$104,561.20 

David C. Williams, Treasurer 



31 



FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 



WILLIAM F. HAYES 
JEROME RICHARDSON 



IPSWICH, MASS. 01938 



HARRY E. MUNRO 
DONALD F. WHISTON 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 1976 



Balance January 1,1976 
Cash received 



Expenditures 
Balance December 31, 1976 



9 2,835.37 
103,204.98 

106,040.35 

102,100.03 

ft 3,940.32 



Little Neck (land only) valued at 
Store building 
Barn 
Wharf 

Cash in First National Bank Ipswich 
On deposit Ipswich Saving B a hk $17, 185.88 

Interest 1,070.00 

On deposit Ipswich Savings Bank 

Farm account 5,974.83 

Interest 322.22 

On deposit Ipswich Savings Bank 

Special Notice account 3,660.42 
Interest 216.70 

On deposit Ipswich Cooperative Bank 7,605.67 
Interest and dividends 530.35 

Cost 

234 Sh. Lst Nat'l Bost. Corp. $2, 748.18 
140 Shares Shaw Ass<!n.Corp. 2,748.63 
Ipswich Coop, paid-up Cert. 2,000.00 



Value 

56,932.25 
3,500.00 
2,000.00 



97,500.00 
4,600.00 
1,090.00 
1, 019.ee 
3,940.32 

18,255.88 



6,297.05 



3,877.12 



8,136.02 



12,432.25 
$157,147.64 



$7,500.00 was donated to the Town for support of schools. 



Treasurer/Manager 



32 



FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 



1976 Report 



Schedule II 



Expenditures 



Taxes: 

Town of Ipswich $81,686.45 

Collector of Internal Revenue 134.55 

Donations : 

Town of Ipswich, School Department 

Repairs ; 

Roads 

W^arf 2, 

Float 

Trees and Brush 

Community House 1, 

Water and Sewer 

Repairs to leaks 

Playground : 

Police: 



Town Officers 
Special police 
Telephone 

Insurance and Bond : 

Office Expenses : 

Salaries and transportation 

Meetings 

Rental, Safe Deposit Box 

Stamps 

Office supplies 

Miscellaneous 



806.14 

296.75 
424.18 

458.85 

041.69 

115.19 

88.19 



1, 
1. 



3, 



316.00 
150.00 
168.89 



524,01 
161.00 
13.00 
65.00 
34.00 
28.06 



$81,820.98 
7,500.00 



5,228.99 
105.00 



2,632.89 
987.00 



3,825.17 



#102, 100.03 



MJ 



33 



BROWN SCHOOL FUND 

TREASURER'S REPORT 28th JANUARY 1977 

Balance 31st December, 1976 $3573.66 

Salem Fire Cents Sayings Bank 

Balance 31st December, 1976 3319.45 

Ipswich Sarings Bank 



Total 28th January 1977 $6893.11 



J. Perry Smith 
Treasurer 



Certified: 

Charlotte E. Terry 
28th January 1977 



34 



ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT 

BALANCE SHEET 

December 31, 1976 



ASSETS 



LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS 



Utility Plant : 

Electric Production Plant 
Electric Transmission Plant 
Electric Distribution Plant 
Electric General Plant 

Total Plant 
Less: Accumulated Depreciation 

Net Plant 

Fund Accounts : 

General new construction 
Building construction 
Depreciation Fund 

Total Fund Account 

Current Assets : 

Operating cash 
Customers' deposit fund 
Customers' accounts receivable 
Material and supplies 
Prepayments 

Total Current Assets 

Deferred Debits : 

Other deferred debits 

Total Assets 



$1,371,663.69 

91,1+10.1+2 

2,175,196.59 

US6.730.g3 

U,095,ooi.23 

1.696.691.1+0 
42,398,309.83 



1,106.61 

3,727.01 

99.662.99 

$ 10U.U96.6l 



270,039. U3 
11,190.00 

226,891.73 
9i.70U.73 
29.883. SO 

$ 629.709.39 



2.30U.79 
S3.13U.820.62 



Surplus : 

Loans repayment 
Unappropriated earned 
surplus 

Total Surplus 

Long-Term Debt : 
Bonds payable 

Current and Accrued 
Liabilities: 

Bonds payable - current 

portion 
Accounts payable 
Customers ' deposits 
Interest accrued 

Total Current and 
Accrued Liabilities 

Deferred Credit : 

Other deferred credits 

Contributions in Aid of 
Construction 



Total Liabilities and 
Surplus 



$1,015,000.00 

1.U20.U80.68 
$2,U35,U80.68 



2Ul.000.00 



31,000.00 

39U.U37.U5 

11,190.00 

3.383.U9 

$ UU0.010.9U 



-.00 



18.329.00 



S3.13U.820.62 



35 






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36 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

John R. Harrigan, Director 

'THE PREPARATION FOR AND THE CARRYING OUT OF ALL 
EMERGENCY FUNCTIONS, OTHER THAN MILITARY FUNCTIONS, 
FOR THE PURPOSE OF MINIMIZING AND REPAIRING INJURY AND 
DAMAGE RESULTING FROM DISASTERS CAUSED BY ATTACK, 
SABOTAGE OR OTHER HOSTILE ACTION: OR BY FIRE, FLOOD 
EARTHQUAKE, OR OTHER CAUSES.'* 

Our report of 1975 talked about expanding Civil Defense in Ipswich. During 
the year of 1976, the Town was fortunate to have a group of citizens come 
forward and form a Search Team of approximately 70 people. These people 
standby ready to help whatever the need may be; a lost child, missing person, 
or a surveillance mission requested by any Department Head. The Civil 
Defense Agency of Ipswich welcomes this fine group of volunteers. 

In 1976, requests for assistance of sandbags and providing pumps, emergency 
lighting to citizens in need, were supplied. As Director, I would like more 
people to evaluate their need before emergencies arise and be better prepared. 
Request for sandbags and emergency gear will be handled promptly to better 
prepare the citizens of Ipswich. 

Tropical Storm Belle cast the spotlight on Civil Preparedness in Ipswich 
during 1976 with two hours after notification of potential problem. The Civil 
Defense Agency along with representatives of all Town Departments stoodby 
ready for any and all emergencies. 

During the year, the Civil Defense played an important part in instituting a 
C.P.R. Course given to 48 citizens of Ipswich; a part of a medical self help 
program. I mention this so I can publicly thank the Cable Hospital Staff for 
their cooperation in this endeavor. 

The Ipswich Auxiliary Police headed by Captain David Clements has 
continued to serve the town by augmenting the regular police department with 
weekly patrol duty. 

*Civil Defense Motto 



COLLECTION-TREASURY DIVISION 

George C. Mourikas, Collector-Treasurer 

The following bills were committed from the Assessor's for collection: Real 
Estate, Personal Property, Farm Animal Excise, and Motor Vehicle Excise. 

A schedule of receipts were rendered to the Town Accountant, monthly. 

A record of Trust Fund transactions were maintained. 

All disbursements, both Town and School, were processed through this 
office, and all receipts were deposited and faithfully recorded. 

43 



COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 

John C. Vincent, Jr., Chairman 

The Committee's principal responsibility is to advise the Board of Selectmen 
and the Town Manager on matters relating to train service to the Town, and in 
particular the contract with the MBTA under which such service is provided. 

Article 43 was submitted to the May, 1976 Town Meeting to authorize the 
continuance of the MBTA contract for 1976, and to appropriate a sum of 
money to fund the contract. It was passed unanimously, and the amount of 
$50,000 was appropriated. 

The Town has been billed, and has paid $25,225.44 for train service for the 
first half of 1976. In view of the State's assumption of 75% (rather than the 
previous 50%) of the MBTA deficit, it is expected that the amount required for 
service during the second half of 1976 will be substantially less. 

The MBTA acquired the passenger rail assets and related rights of way of 
the B&M as of the end of 1976. It is expected that State and federal funding 
will become available under the State's Commuter Rail Improvement Program, 
and that improvements in the form of rebuilt cars, roadbed and bridge 
construction, and faster and more reliable service will be forthcoming. 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Sally Weatherall, Chairman 

1976 was a year of planning by the Conservation Commission. With a great 
deal of citizen help, we completed the Natural Resource Planning Program, 
begun the previous year with the Planning Advisory Committee of the Planning 
Board, working under the U.S. Soil Conservation Service. The following 
reports were written and are available to interested citizens: agriculture, 
woodland, water, wetland and upland wildlife, recreation, urban and unique 
features. Recommendations were included in the reports and illustrated on a 
map called "Land of Conservation Interest". Information on these reports will 
be used in an Open Space/Recreation Plan required of the Self-Help program 
and the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation, should the Town wish to seek State 
and Federal funding for land acquisition. 

One of the Commission's greatest achievements is its collection of Town 
maps, all on a scale of 1000 ft. = l inch. This series of maps has proved 
invaluable to us and to other town committees, as well as the Town Engineer. 
They are catalogued in the Conservation Commission office on the second floor 
of the Town Hall. 

In May a sign was raised on the edge of the 77 acres purchased from the 
Marini Farm on Linebrook Road, designating the site as "Town of Ipswich 
Conservation Land". The Marinis have leased back a portion of the property 
for growing vegetables, thus fulfilling the purpose of preserving agricultural 
land. 

Of all the work of the Commission, the responsibility for the State "Dredge 
and Fill" law, Ch. 131, Sec. 40, is the most demanding. There were eleven 
wetland hearings this year, more than double the number held in any year since 
this responsibility was given to the Commission in 1972. 

44 



During the year the Commission was confronted with several environmental 
problems. Along with the Selectmen and Representative Lane, the 
Conservation Commission advised the Commissioner of Environmental Affairs 
to refuse to accept the PCD environmental impact study which claimed that its 
sewer disposal system would be harmless to the Dow watershed. The Rowley 
Planning Board notified the Commission of a 450 unit proposed development 
on Prospect Hill. A portion of the land in the development lies in the Dow 
watershed. The development lies adjacent to the PCD. Together these two 
developments threaten an enormous environmental change to the northwestern 
section of town. 

The past year saw the resignation of several members due to lack of time. 
One resignee noted that the Conservation Commission needs a Conservation 
Officer to do the incredible amount of work that falls on Commission members. 
Three new members were appointed by the Town Manager in 1976: Carol 
Grimes, Patti Hall and Raymond Hodgdon. One position remains to be filled. 

The people of Ipswich have made it clear that they want the town to retain 
its rural character. While Ipswich must grow, it does not have to explode 
helplessly. The Commission will continue to work hard on its job of preserving 
our natural resources. We invite anybody who wants to help us to join one of 
our subcommittees. 

DOG OFFICER 

John B. Macken 

Animals reported lost 

Animals found 

Animals confined to pound 

Animals returned to owner 

Animals disposed 

Animals injured 

Animals killed 

Animals killed by dogs 

Dog bites 

Complaints received and answered 

1976 was one of progress in the area of dog control. The dog control problem 
is far from being solved but there has been vastly increased awareness and 
cooperation from dog owners. 

A van has been purchased, painted and equipped to eliminate the problem of 
transporting dogs. A police radio has been installed in my home. This has 
improved communication and made me more available to answer any 
complaints at night and on weekends. 

The Highway Department has installed new four inch pipe at the Dog Pound. 
This has facilitated routine cleaning and maintenance of the Dog Pound. 

An- open forum meeting was held for dog owners having problems confining 
their dogs. 

I assisted a local Girl Scout Troop in earning a merit badge. The purpose 
was emergency First Aid and caring for a sick or injured domestic animal. 

I sincerely thank you for your support and cooperation. I am looking forward 
to the challange of further improving dog control in the community of Ipswich. 

45 



1975 


1976 


120 


183 


95 


150 


175 


156 


75 


99 


70 


36 


49 


24 


60 


40 


7 


33 


34 


49 


1825 


1122 



ECONOMIC AND INDUSTRIAL 
DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

Paul Beswick, Chairman 

1976 has resulted to be a year where major progress has taken place for the 
IDC. 

Throughout 1976 several industries, both existing and prospective, have met 
with the commission or it's chairman on matters concerning relocation, 
expansion, or rearrangement of existing facilities. 

A nationally known firm in the electronics industry seriously considered 
locating a new plant in Ipswich. 

In the Spring of 1976 the Industrial Park study funds were granted by the 
Farmer's Home Administration through the office of OEDC in Gloucester. The 
park district is located off High Street between the Boston and Maine Railroad 
tracks and Paradise Road. The park study was conducted by the engineering 
firm of Whitman & Howard of Wellesley and was finished during December. A 
copy of the park study is available at the Public Library and shows that 
approximately 30 industrial sites are available in this region. The study includes 
careful consideration of historical tradition, environmental considerations, and 
public works considerations. 

Prior to the park study, suitability of this site was questionable. Today it 
appears that the park study has cleared up uncertainties about suitability. 

In November, 1976 early indications showed this park to be feasible, and 
the IDC set about planning the next steps. 

The IDC sees it's role of attracting ancf developing clean, light industry to 
Ipswich in a way that will support the tax base, create jobs, while considering 
the character and tradition of the community. The planned Industrial Park 
makes possible achieving such a goal in contrast to the random developments 
that presently take place. 

In 1976 the IDC began a much closer relationship with the Ipswich Bay 
Economic Development Company, a private group of industrially minded 
business and local citizens. 

1977 promises considerable benefit to the Town in terms of the park 
development, continuing to attract light industry, and working with existing 
firms. 



46 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT 

Alfred L. Tobiasz, Manager 

Office — 222 High Street, Hours 8:00 A.M. — 4:00 P.M. Tel. 356-4331,4332. 
Emergency calls night, Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays call Power Plant 
356-3600. 

At the Annual Town Meeting the voters authorized the town to become a 
member of the Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company 
(MMWEC) and accepted Chapter 775 of the Acts of 1975. MMWEC provides 
for joint ownership of electric power facilities, the construction and operation 
of which will be sponsored by the cities and towns and investor owned power 
companies. This will allow Ipswich to obtain the advantages of bulk power 
supply pooling with other towns through the operation of MMWEC and obtain 
services in connection with bulk power supply. 

MAJOR CONSTRUCTION PROPOSED 

1. Install 24000 volts transfer switch and other extensive modifications and 
extensions to accomplish receiving firm power capacity on our Substation No. 
4 adjacent to our Electric Department Building. 

2. Install 15 KV spacer cable on Linebrook Road, County Road. 

3. Install 25 KV spacer cable on Mitchell Road and Avery Street. 

CONSTRUCTION COMPLETED 1976 

1. New primary conductors were installed along the following streets: 
Linebrook Road, Lakemans Lane, Sagamore Road, Mt. Pleasant Street and 
Brownville Avenue. 

2. 25 Streetlighting fixtures, 25 overhead services and 6 underground service, 
11 poles, 36,360 ft. of overhead wire and 1,300 ft. of underground cables and 
848 KVA of transformers were added to the system. 

MAINTENANCE 

39 overhead and 6 underground services, 21 poles and 14 streetlighting fixtures 
were replaced. Maintenance at the Generating Plant was carried out by the 
Power Plant personnel and all units are in good operating condition. 









STATISTICS 




Aver. KWH i 


ised 


by 


KW Peak 


Meters in 


Residential Customers 


Demand 


Service 


2348 






3,940 


3325 


2394 






6,100 


3632 


3401 






8,350 


4011 


5186 






11,450 


4412 


6014 






13,200 


4720 



Year 

1956 
1961 
1966 
1971 
1976 

POWER GENERATED & PURCHASED 

1975 1976 

Generated 11,369,440 8,476,860 

Purchased 48,786,170 53,802,874 

Total KWH 60,155,610 62,279,734 

This represents an increase of 3.53% in power usage as compared to 1975 

47 



ESSEX COUNTY 
MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 

Robert W. Spencer, Superintendent 

The Essex County Mosquito Control Project organized in 1965 through 
legislative act serves nineteen communities in Essex County along with 
Winthrop and Revere in Suffolk County. 

In 1976 the two tractor-backhoe units owned by the project reclaimed 25,970 
feet of fresh water streams while the tractor-scavel plow unit recut 24,345 feet 
of salt marsh ditching. Another 7,040 feet of clogged brooks were cleaned 
manually. Oftentimes, the overhanging brush must be removed from the stream 
banks to accomodate the heavy equipment. In 1976 a total of 2,755 feet of 
brushing was accomplished. The maintenance of ditching installed in previous 
years is an ever increasing problem. During the past year, blockages and debris 
were removed from 3000 feet of existing drainage systems. 

One of the most important phases of the year-round control effort is the 
chemical treatment of temporary woodland pools and other known breeding 
sites which cannot be eliminated on a permanent basis. This requires the 
application of an insecticide dust to the surface of the ice during the winter 
months and a liquid material to the surface of the water upon the arrival of 
spring when the mosquito larvae begin to hatch from overwintering eggs. Over 
1000 acres were thus treated in Essex County during 1976. 

During the period from June 1 to Labor Day, the active mosquito season, the 
project conducts a spray program to reduce the number of biting insects. The 
older method of thermal aerosol fogging with insecticide and fuel oil has been 
discarded in favor of a more effective system known as ULV (Ultra Low 
Volume). Truck mounted units travelling at twelve miles per, hour dispense an 
undiluted pesticide at the rate of four ounces per minute in minute droplets 
which are carried hundreds of feet by the air stream created by the spray 
machine and natural movement of the atmosphere. The per acre dosage under 
the ULV system amounts to one-half ounce of insecticide per acre treated as 
opposed to the old method, the ULV application enables much greater 
coverage in a given time period. While the spray program is more effective and 
less expensive it presents one disadvantage. The minute particles of spray 
material are often times invisible as discharged from the machine, triggering 
calls from a good number of residents reporting the trucks passing their homes 
with the sprayer shut off. 

Another phase of the mosquito control program which was started a year ago 
was expanded in 1976. That was the treatment of the catchbasins in the several 
cities and heavier populated towns. The material used was a highly refined 
petroleum known commercially as Flit M-L-O. 

The summer of 1976 was by far the best year yet experienced by the 
mosquito control project from the standpoint of total mosquito population. We 
know that our program over the years is gradually reducing the mosquito 
nuisance, but once in a while we experience a season when climatic conditions 
are unsuitable for widespread mosquito breeding. Such was the situation in 
1976 not only in Essex County, but along the entire East Coast of the United 
States. Some say that a severely cold winter will adversely affect mosquito 
production. If this is so, perhaps mother nature will assist us again in 1977. 



48 



SUMMARY OF WORK ACCOMPLISHED IN IPSWICH DURING 1976 

Pre-Hatch or Winter Ice Dusting 9 Acres 

Spring Larviciding 27 Acres 

Upland Ditching w/Power Equipment 938 Feet 

Salt Marsh Ditching w/Power Equipment 9,175 Feet 

Brushing and Chipping 305 Feet 

Catchbasins Treated (910) 6/3 - 7/1/2/6/12/14/15/19 

Spraying 6/3/18 - 7/20/26/27 - 8/3/12/17/24/31 



FIRE STATION COMMITTEE 

Merle Pimentel, Chairman 

The Committee was appointed by the Selectmen for the purpose of studying 
the need for a fire station in outer Linebrook and to come up with a 
recommendation to the Town. 

After looking at the available sites to build a new station and looking at the 
Rust building, which is already there, the committee has decided to recommend 
to the town that they purchase the Rust building. The committee has asked the 
Town Manager to study the various possibilities of staffing the building for a 
fire station. An article will be placed on the town meeting warrant for May. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Melvin Bowen, Acting Chief 

There were several large and serious fires this Year. Due to a new and 
different Civil Service Exam, the town lost four good firefighters with a total of 
17 years experience. They were replaced by five new men who seem to be 
doing a very creditable job. A new Forestry Truck was ordered this year and 
should be delivered in late July. The present personnel compliment consists of: 

Permanent force 
3 Captains 
14 privates 

Call force 

3 lieutenants 
25 firefighters 

Fire Loss Report 

Assessed value of property having fire 1,632,854 

Fire insurance carried 2,973,845 

Fire insurance paid 307,815 

49 



GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Irving G. Small, Chairman 

The Committee held four formal meetings during the calendar year, one each 
in March, April, October and November. 

At each of our meetings, we considered the question 8 referred to us by the 
Board of Selectmen — of whether the Town should abandon the traditional 
"open town meeting" and accept the "representative town meeting" form of 
government. To assist us in our deliberations, our member, Mr. Jacob M. 
Israelsohn, secured extensive research material on the subject from the files of 
the Massachusetts League of Cities and Towns. The consensus developed from 
our discussions was that Ipswich ought not to move at this time to adopt the 
"representative town meeting"; that, unless to accomodate in the meeting hall 
all voters who wish to attend, the "open town meeting" is the preferable form 
for Ipswich. 

Our meeting of November 10, 1976 was a public hearing held in the 
Auditorium of the Electric Department Building on High Street. We scheduled 
such a meeting, intending to afford to town officials and to members of the 
public at large an opportunity to comment on the issue of "open" versus 
"representative" town meetings. No town officer appeared at the hearing; and 
the only member of the public to appear was opposed to our adoption of the 
"representative town meeting". The Committee then concluded its 
deliberations on the question and voted (4-1) that the Chairman report to the 
Board of Selectmen our opposition to the adoption of the "representative town 
meeting" in Ipswich. The Chairman has so advised the Chairman of the Board 
of Selectmen. 

The Committee held its organizational meeting for fiscal year 1977 on 
October 26, 1976, on which occasion Mr. Irving G. Small was re-elected 
Chairman and Mr. Jacob M. Israelsohn was elected vice-chairman. 



GROWTH POLICY COMMITTEE 

George Mat hey, Chairman 

As provided for in the Massachusetts Growth Policy Development Act, 
Chapter 807 of the Acts of 1975, the Ipswich Growth Policy Committee was 
appointed in January, 1976. Five of the ten members required by the Act were 
mandated by that Act to be the chairmen of the Board of Selecmen, Planning 
Board, Conservation Commission, Housing Authority, and Board of Health or 
their designees. 

As intended by the Act, the Committee evaluated the effects of past growth 
and development patterns, attempted to formulate future growth and 
development goals, and to identify areas of critical planning concern, including 
the interaction between population, commercial and industrial growth, 
preservation of historical resources, such as our many 17th and 18th century 
houses, marshes and wetlands, beaches and dunes, flood plains, watersheds, 
agricultural lands, forests and open land, property taxes, water supply, zoning 
and housing needs, as well as how all of these are affected by activities of state 
agencies, of neighboring cities and towns, of the region and vice versa. 

50 



In accordance with the provisions of the Act the Committee held two public 
hearings, one to receive any citizen input prior to preparing a tentative 
statement of Growth Problems and Priorities and the other for further citizen 
input and reaction to the Tentative Statement. On July 15, 1976, within the 
time allotted by the statute, a final Local Statement was submitted to the 
regional planning agency, in our case the Metropolitan Area Council, which in 
turn has held hearings (attended by members of the Committee) and prepared 
its report, a compilation of the statements submitted by all in the region. Each 
regional planning agency's, statement has been submitted to the Office of State 
Planning, which will summarize all material submitted to it and ultimately 
recommend to the General Court and the Governor, standards, criteria, 
approaches and strategies for future growth in the Commonwealth. 

Copies of the Ipswich and Regional Growth Policy Statements are available 
in the Library. 




HARBORS 

Peter S. George, Harbormaster 

The year 1976 was a good boating year for the Town which saw us through 
with no accidents. 

All areas were patrolled, and as in past years, the Registry of Marine 
Recreational Vehicles assisted me. Numerous citations were issued and were 
prosecuted in court. 

Considerable work was done on the mooring program, which we have made 
our main issue. Warning and citations were issued on these, and the stubborn 
cases are going to court, and will be prosecuted. 

On several occassions, the Harbor Department was called out for Search and 
Rescue missions. At one time a massive sea and land search, including tracking 
dogs, was conducted for a senior citizen who had been missing from a nursing 
home for twenty six hours. The citizen was found near the waters' edge. 

A marine two-way V.H.F. radio was purchased and enabled me to be in 
contact with many boats in distress. 

A course was taken in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation which qualifies me to 
perform C.P.R. on a victim. 

With the cooperation of the Public Works and Electric Departments, the 
floats and ramp were put in the water and hauled out again for storage and 
repair for next season. 

51 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Edwin N. Bronk, Agent 
In 1976 the following number of permits were issued: 

Plumbing Permits 144 

Gas Permits 1 1 1 

Burial Permits 89 

Permits were also issued for milk, restaurant operation, ice cream 
manufacture, etc. 

Between March 1 and April 30, 1976, a total of 85 percolation and ground 
water tests were conducted, resulting in the approval of 74 sites for 
construction installation of septic systems and the disapproval of 11 sites not 
meeting the standards of Article XI of the State Sanitary Code. 

Clinics held in 1976: 

Rabies Clinic (May) 230 immunizations 

Influenza Clinic (Swine Flu) see below 

A Federal Government sponsored Influenza Clinic was conducted at the 
Cable Memorial Hospital and the Caldwell Nursing Home in October, 1976, 
with 1,405 persons participating. 

The Bi-Valent vaccine (Swine Flu and Victoria "A") was administered to 
persons over 65 years of age and all persons with chronic illnesses as 
requested. The Mene-Valent (Swine Flu only) vaccine was administered to all 
other persons as requested. 

The Well-Child Clinic is held on the first Monday of each month at the 
Winthrop School between the hours of 3:00 and 4:00 p.m. The clinic is 
operated for pre-schoolers only, offering medical examinations and the 
administering of immunizations for which no fee is charged. This clinic will 
continue to operate until June, 1977 when it will be discontinued due to 
non-participation of those eligible. This may be partially due to a decrease in 
the population of pre-school children and the choice of many families to 
consult private physicians. 

A continuing inspection program was conducted during 1976. Program of 
house paint was for those whose children are thought to be affected by Lead 
Paint. 

A total of 4,300 units of biologies (including polio, tetanus, typhoid, measles, 
mumps, rubella, globulin, etc.) were distributed to local doctors and the 
hospital. 

The Recycling Center, located at the Town Garage Area on County Road, is 
maintained five days a week from 8:00 to 4:00 p.m., and handles paper, glass 
and metal. 

Rubbish and garbage will NOT be picked up on the following holidays: 

New Year's Day January 1 

Memorial Day Last Monday in May 

Independence Day July 4 

Labor Day First Monday in September 

Thanksgiving Last Thursday in November 

Christmas December 25 

During the holiday week, rubbish and garbage will be picked up the day after 
the normal pick-up day. 

52 



THE HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John F. Conley, Chairman 

The Historical Commission was involved during the first part of 1976 with 
the preparation of an application for a Community Development Block Grant 
on behalf of the Town. David Johnson, the technical representative from the 
U.S. Department of H.U.D., had recommended that the Commission's work in 
preservation as reported in "Something to Preserve" be used as a basis for an 
application for a grant that would be used primarily in the rehabilitation of 
some of the Town's historic homes. The application was prepared by Paul 
McGinley, and the sum of $100,000 was awarded to the Town in July. The 
Commission appointed Frank Houde as Project Director, and the preliminary 
background work was underway before the end of the year. Part of the Grant 
is to be devoted to a demonstration project of improvement of an historic area 
with landscaping etc. The Commission has chosen a portion of North Main St., 
with the work to be done in the spring of 1977. 

An application for a second Community Development Block Grant was being 
prepared at the close of the year. 

During the past several months, the Commission has been bringing to a 
conclusion its earlier Pilot Demonstration Project funded equally by H.U.D. 
and the Ipswich Heritage Trust. The owners of six more homes of architectural 
and historic importance have accepted Preservation Agreements with the 
Historical Commission. They are as follows: 

Mr. and Mrs. Conant H. Barton 53 Candlewood Road 

Mrs. Anne Cowles 37 High Street 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Fouser 19 North Main Street 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Moscarillo 57 South Village Green 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard H. Oakes 60 North Main Street 

Mrs. Starr Ockenga Oury 53 Turkey Shore Road 



The continued sales of the Project report, "Something to Preserve", have 
been most gratifying since there have been requests from all parts of the 
country and Canada. 

The regular work of the Commission — the maintenance of the plaques and 
correspondence — has been carried on as usual. 

It was with great sorrow that the Commission learned of the death of David 
Johnson of the H.U.D. office in Washington. Our Pilot Demonstration Project 
at first was one of his routine responsibilities, but he came to care very much 
for our Town and its heritage of historic homes. He was a friend of Ipswich, 
and we shall miss him. 



53 



IPSWICH HOUSING AUTHORITY 

(Miss) Jane Bokron - Executive Director 
Mr. Stanley Eustace - Chairman 

The Ipswich Housing Authority currently administers three (3) PROJECTS 
namely; (24 Low Income Family Units-Veterans Project 200-1). .(20 elderly 
units at Southern Manor-667-C2)..(100 elderly units at Caroline 
Avenue-667-C2)..(80 Rent Subsidy scattered housing units-707) 

The proposed elderly and family housing. .94 units. (80 elderly and 14 
family).. The Contract for Financial Assistance for Project 667-4 and 705-1 was 
approved and monies of $2,350,000.00 were received on March 12, 1976. 
Ground breaking scheduled for May 1976 is still pending. Signing of 
Construction Contract with Coronis Construction Co. has been scheduled for 
February 18, 1977. 

PROJECT 200-1 (Veterans Low Income Family) These 24 units of 1-2-3-4 
bedrooms were built 1950. Each has its own gas furnace, gas stove and gas hot 
water tank. The average shelter rent is $88.00 per month. Much has been done 
to improve these units during the last five years. Improvements are as follows: 
All 7 buildings were re-roofed. IHA gave the Town of Ipswich $45,000 to the 
Municipal Sewer System. Installed new sinks and formica counter tops in all 
apartments, new kitchen floors, new bathroom tile floors, new electric fixtures 
in kitchens, painted 15 of the 25 apartments completely, installed new hot 
water heaters, new heating units for the 2-4 bedroom apartments, new uniform 
Colonial mail boxes, new wrought iron hand rails, a children's bus shelter, fire 
extinguishers in all apartments, new water shut offs, including mains, new solid 
wood exterior doors plus many combination doors, showers installed (there 
were none there), splash blocks installed at each down spout, stalled speed 
bumps, new outside sill cocks, new formica around bathtub areas and many 
other improvements, (such as a Summer Program for the little children (include 
were free lunches daily.) 

PROJECTS 667-C2..(120 elderly units) The 20 elderly units at Southern 
Manor are heated by gas. The exterior of all units was painted during the past 
year. Shelter rent is $62.00 per month. The 100 elderly units on Caroline 
Avenue are electrically heated. The shelter rent is $81.00 per month. Many of 
these units were completely painted in oyster white scrubable paint. 15 
passenger Mini-Bus has been ordered for the Elderly. 

RENT SUBSIDY UNITS. .77 for PROJECT 707... Rent Subsidy provides 
subsidies for low income families, including elderly and disabled persons. It 
allows the Authority to rent privately owned apartments and pay a rent 
supplement to make up the difference in the agreed totaly monthly rent. This 
program has helped landlords improve conditions in their apartments, thereby 
preventing slums. During 1976 IHA paid a total of $87,846.00 to private 
landlords for these units. The average rent subsidy tenants paid was $77.00 per 
month, while the IHA paid an average of $95.00 per month to landlords for 
1-2-3-4 bedroom units. 

HOT LUNCH PROGRAM.. This highly successful congregate dining 
program was started February 25, 1975 and has been increased from 50 to 75 
daily hot lunches for Caroline Avenue, Southern Manor and many elderly 
citizens of The Commonwealth. Ethnic Hot Lunches for the past year were: 
Polish Day, Greek Day and All American Day. Meals on Wheels Hot Lunches 
are delivered to many shut ins 5 days a week. 



54 



WHITTIER-MANOR CLUB (Elderly) This social group of elderly tenants 
from Southern Manor and Caroline Avenue are most active daily and meet the 
first Wednesday of each month. Under the presidency of Percy Cheverie they 
have made donations of $525.00 during 1976, namely $100 each to Jaws of Life, 
Cable Hospital Drive, Council of Ageing, Salvation Army and smaller 
donations to other agencies. They have donated a new piano and a 16 mm 
Movie Projector (with sound) to the IHA. We are very proud of all of our 
elderly tenants and wish them all Good Health and Much Happiness for 1977. 

There were 6 deaths in the elderly projects. To their families, we extend our 
most sincere sympathy. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Eleanor M. Crowley, Librarian 

In October of 1976 a record was set for borrowing activity at the Library as 
9,929 items were charged from the library's collections by patrons. Similar 
record-breaking peaks of activity were noted for the summer months, reflecting 
a high rate of recreational reading — nearly 60% of total circulation. A 
statistical summary and comparison may be found at the end of this report. 
(Books only.) 

With the addition of 2,889 new titles in 1976, the library's total collection 
exceeds 55,000 volumes, many of which have been transferred to inactive 
housing in the attic due to the extreme shortage of space in the building. Over 
50% of the residents are holders of library cards; 682*new cards were 
distributed in 1976. Reference transactions and questions handled throughout 
the year accounted for 20,663 consultations within the collection; an average of 
3,773 persons per month used the library. 

The Bicentennial year was marked by an exhibit of Revolutionary documents 
and manuscripts and a presentation by "Ipswich Speaks" of John Updike's "A 
Good Place", a sound/slide program narrated by the author. 

Film programs and story hours for children continue to attract many 
youngsters. Library programming for adults sponsored by the Friends of the 
Library was highlighted by a musical program by the Bowfort Ensemble and a 
Polish papercutting demonstration. The valued support and interest of the 
Friends is a continuing asset to the Library. 

A Federal Grant in the amount of $8,663 was awarded the Library in late 
1976 under the Library Services and Construction Act for a demonstration 
project designed to assist people in the area of employment opportunity. The 
Newburyport office of the Massachusetts Division of Employment Security 
established a "mini-office" for the job-seaker; early in 1977 the Library will 
make, their daily job listings available to the community, along with other 
audiovisual materials and programs relating to job hunting and employment 
opportunities. 

In late summer, the Board of Library Trustees named the architectural firm 
of Anderson, Notter & Finegold to develop plans to the extent necessary to 
apply for 100% funding of a $729,000, 6,000 square foot addition to the library 
under the Public Works Construction Act of 1976. In the closing weeks of the 

55 



year, word was received that the project was not selected for funding. The 
Board voted to continue work on this sorely needed project in anticipation of 
additional funding at a later date. 

The Board accepted the registration in September of Judge Thomas A. 
Johnson, and welcomed Hubert A. Johnson, a publishing executive, to fill the 
vacancy created. 

Remember to call on your Public Library for all your informational and 
recreational reading needs. 



COMBINED BOOK CIRCULATION 1975 vs. 1976 



VOLS. 






























9,000 
















f.. 














8,500 


1975 






1 
I 


V 






/ s 


\ 












8,000 




X 


/ 
\ / 


A 


\ 

\ 




1 


f 

f 


s 


V 


^ 


\ 






7,500 






• 


' \ 


\ 




1 


f\ 


s 




"\ 


\ 






7,000 


1976 


*- 


-J 




\ 


<# 


/; 




V 






\ 


v 


^1975 


6,500 


























\ 


-1976 


6,000 






























MONTH 




J 


F 


M 


A 


M 


J 


Jy 


A 


S 





N 


D 

































































1975 
1976 



AVERAGE # BOOKS/MONTH: 

1974 7,218 

1975 7,576 

1976 7,658 



56 



PLANNING BOARD 

George H.W. Hayes II, Chairman 

During the past year the Planning Board has continued to review numerous 
plans submitted to it for "Planning Board Approval Not Required ,, and 
answered inquiries from citizens regarding zoning questions and problems. 

We have also taken specific action in regard to several developments in the 
community, namely: the completion of the Herrick Drive Development off 
Linebrook Road, the approval of the subdivision plan for the Margaret Reid 
subdivision off Argilla Road, the recision of the Woodland Conservators Co. 
Inc. subdivision plan for Heartbreak Hill. 

The major taking concerning the revision of the entire zoning by laws was 
commenced during the Fall months with the assistance of the firm of Metcalf & 
Eddy as planning consultants. This project is being done in connection with the 
Massachusetts Zoning Enabling Act which will go into effect by operation of 
law on June 30, 1978. 

In order to comply with the requirements noted therein, we determined that 
the above mentioned revision of the town zoning bylaw was the best approach 
to take. Using the material collected by the PAC and the Conservation 
Commission, along with the opinion of the citizens of the Town regarding their 
desire to keep Ipswich as rural as possible, we hope to be able to present to 
the annual town meeting in May a comprehensive and acceptable zoning bylaw 
for approval. 



POLICE STATION STUDY COMMITTEE 

George Mathey, Chairman 

Since its formation by vote of this past Fall's Special Town Meeting, the 
Police Station Committee has: 

(1) become familiar with the present facilities; 

(2) toured existing facilities in Andover, Boxford, Manchester, and North 
Reading; 

(3) reviewed recommendations of the National Clearing House of Criminal 
Justice; 

(4) determined that the present police station facilities are inadequate and 
outdated by any nationally recognized standards and that they cannot 
protect the rights of individuals having business with the police or the 
public which uses the Town Hall intensively or of the police 
themselves; 

(5) decided, therefore, that some form of new or remodeled facility at 
minimum cost must be provided; 

(6)agreed on a minimum program which delineates immediate needs but 
which can be easily expanded in the future to meet additional demands; 

57 



(7) viewed and considered town and privately owned sites which might be 
suitable for a new facility and decided that for budgetary reasons only 
the former can be realistically considered; 

(8) examined existing town owned structures which could be remodeled 
for such a use; 

(9) reviewed past proposals for renovations to the Town Hall and Annex; 

(10) arrived at preliminary budgets for providing minimum but adequate 
facilities in either a new or existing structure; 

(11) received from the Town Manager a survey of the physical and human 
needs of all town departments and judicial function offices presently 
located in the Town Hall and Annex so that if it is decided to locate 
police facilities in one or the other of these structures a sensible, 
logical, efficient and economical arrangement of spaces can be 
provided which will suit not only the Police Department but all others 
involved; 

(12) agreed to present recommendations to the 1977 Annual Town 
Meeting. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Arm and R. Brouillette, Chief 

The Police Department answered 9654 service connected complaints and 
covered 506 traffic accidents in which 110 persons were injured,- four of them 
fatally. The Department served 1033 summonses for this and other courts, 113 
warrants, issued 487 traffic citations, and 700 parking tickets for which $2116 
was turned back to the Town. Other fines returned to the Town $3,586. 

The Department is staffed with 21 officers and one parttime clerk. We 
operate three marked cruisers and one unmarked Inspector's car. These 
vehicles traveled well over 200,000 miles patrolling the Town. 

Last year the Chairman of the Selectmen asked the Meeting to appoint a 
Police Station Building Study Committee. This was done and a report will be 
forthcoming from that committee. The physical plant has not had any repair or 
remodeling for several years and is totally inadequate for the police function. I 
feel that the Department is adequately staffed for the coming year provided a 
proposed re-organization of the court system does not take effect. 

Below is a list of selected activities covering the last four years. 

1973 1974 1975 1976 

Breaking & Entering 
Larcenies 

Stolen Motor Vehicles 
Armed Robbery 
Malicious Damage 
Assaults 

Businesses Found Open 
Arrests 



130 


141 


130 


152 


294 


375 


428 


494 


44 


40 


43 


47 





2 


4 


1 


455 


490 


475 


603 


105 


165 


133 


142 


578 


425 


489 


315 


704 


620 


685 


912 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Armand T. Michaud, Director 

The Public Works Department coordinates the activities of the Highway, 
Forestry, Equip. Maint., Town Hall and Annex Bldg. Maint. and Snow & Ice 
divisions. Personnel are assigned to specific divisions; however, they are 
interchanged to assist with larger projects when required. 

HIGHWAY DIVISION 

Norman Stone, Foreman 

The Highway Division is charged with the maintenance and repairs of the 
Town's streets, sidewalks and drainage systems. Regular duties include 
patching and sweeping streets, repairing fences and guard rails, installing traffic 
and street signs, painting traffic lines and curbing and cleaning catch basins. 
Major projects performed this year as follows: 

A bituminous wearing surface was applied on the following streets: 



Argilla Road 

(270' at Rocky Hill Road 
Brown Square 
Heatherside Lane 
High Street Extension 
Hovey Street 
Linebrook Road (Chapter 90) 



Littleneck Road 

(Plover Hill Road to the Pavillion) 

Waldingfield Road 

(Rte. 1A to Goodhue Street) 
Water Street 



A number of streets were oiled including: 
Candlewood Road 
Greenspoint Road 
Linebrook Road 
Old Right Road 
Pineswamp Road 



Plains Road 
Riverbank Road 
Sagamore Road 
Scotton's Lane 
Town Farm Road 



Approximately 1500' of Linebrook Road has been rebuilt through Chapter 90 
funding (part of a continuing state project). 

Shoulders were cut back on: 



Argilla Road 
Candlewood Road 
Chebbacco Road 
Greenspoint Road 
Hodges Way 
Linebrook Road 

Drainage problems were corrected on: 

Candlewood Road 
Central Street 
Chattanooga Road 
Clark Road 
Dudley Way 
East Street 



Littleneck Road 
North Ridge Road 
Sky Top Road 
Stage Hill Road 
Town Farm Road 
Waldingfield Road 



Green Street 
Island Park Road 
North Ridge Road 
Paradise Road 
Town Wharf 
Currier Park 



A new 1977 Chevrolet 4-Wheel Drive dump truck was purchased this year 
along with a 1976 Flink hydraulic drive spreader. 



59 



FORESTRY DIVISION 

Charles Foley, Forman 

Combating the Dutch Elm disease continues to be a major project for this 
division. Approximately 126 Dutch Elm diseased or beetle infested trees were 
removed this year. A new program has been started by the Elm Research 
Institute. This is to try to control the Dutch Elm disease by injecting Elm trees 
with Lignasan BLP, a new treatment to kill fungus. Three injectors have been 
purchased and the injecting has been done by our Forestry crew to 
approximately 40 trees this year. (The Ipswich Garden Club has also purchased 
one of these injectors) 

Mosquito spraying was done for a 13 week period to all areas of the town. 
Spraying was scheduled for four nights each week, which seemed to be very 
successful. 

Other spraying this year included a dormant spray and 2 leaf sprays. Also a 
spray for fall web worms was used in August. 

The Forestry division planted 75 Maple trees and an assortment of 175 other 
trees around town. Again this year, 350 trees were distributed to all 1st graders 
during Arbor Day ceremonies. 

Other work consisted of trimming and pruning trees, mowing sides of roads 
and removing hanging limbs after snow and rain storms. 

A new 1977 Chevrolet dump truck was purchased this year along with a 1976 
Micro-Geri mosquito sprayer. 

EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

This division is charged with the maintenance and repairs of the Highway & 
Forestry divisions' vehicles. At present there are 30 pieces of motorized 
equipment. Each piece of equipment must be kept in top condition to insure 
it's availability when needed. Statistical records of all vehicles expenses are 
maintained at the Public Works Administration office. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

Two coats of paint were applied to the exterior of the Town Hall and the 
trim was painted on the Annex. 

Both buildings were routinely maintained and an effort was made to 
economize on maintenance materials by bulk purchases. 

SNOW & ICE DIVISION 

The Public Works divisions combined their efforts during the winter months. 
Work consisted of plowing roads, sanding, salting, hauling snow, filling sand 
barrels, clearing catchbasins and answering miscellaneous complaints. 
Personnel who assisted the Public Works Department during the height of the 
snow storms were from the following Departments: Cemetery, Electric, Parks, 
Sewer and Water. Also, services of 17 private contractors were used. 



60 



RECREATION and PARKS DEPARTMENT 

James H. Daly, Director 

RECREATION — In keeping with past policy, nine playgrounds in all 
sections of Town were staffed and organized programs of sports activities, arts 
and crafts and special events were carried out during the eight week program 
during July and August. The special events included hula hoop and frisbee 
contests that qualified Ipswich youngsters for both regional and sectional 
competition. Hoops and frisbees were made available by the sponsoring 
companies at no cost to the Town. 

Popular were outings via busses to the Crane Castle grounds and the beach, 
to Benson's Animal Farm and to Canobie Lake amusement park. Visiting 
Ipswich were the Little Red Wagon theatre group from New Hampshire and 
the Zoomobile out of Boston. 

Two tennis tourneys were conducted in conjunction with National Tennis 
Week and the local training program. Close to 400 children and adults 
participated in the tennis instruction program that encompassed all age groups. 
Twilight instructions for working adults were well attended. 

Slightly over 600 youngsters made up the swim instruction program that was 
carried out at the Don Bosco pool. Because of the large turnout, the program 
was extended from eight weeks to ten weeks and double sessions (morning and 
early evening) were the rule rather than the exception. The instructions 
covered beginners through senior life saving. An increase in the number of 
participants is expected again this year. Youngsters are picked up and returned 
to the various playgrounds by bus which is made available during the summer 
months by the School Department. 

Two Pony League Baseball teams were sponsored involving boys between 
the ages of 13 and 16. Managing, coaching and transportation personnel were 
all volunteers. Both Ipswich entries enjoyed highly successful seasons in the 
eight team Intertown League. Managers were Frank Rose and Joseph Navarro. 

Your Recreation Department was most active in organizing and carrying out 
the annual Marathon races in conjunction with Olde Ipswich Days week long 
activities. Co-sponsors last summer and for the foreseeable future was the local 
V.F.W. and it's Auxiliary which made all their facilities available and provided 
food and drink to all following the races. Prizes to the winners were provided 
by the V.F.W. and the Town. 

The Recreation Department also organized golf instructions for all age groups 
at the Candlewood course and ballroom dance instruction for women's 
Slimnastics in the Memorial Building. Basketball programs for all age groups 
were conducted throughout the winter months at several locations on nights 
and Saturdays. 

Assistance with their special projects, functions and day trips was provided 
to the Golden Age Club whose membership has grown to 444 senior citizens. 
Highlight activities include their annual picnic, Christmas party, Installation 
banquet, and a dinner show at Romie's in Danvers. Arthur Goodfellow will be 
concluding his two year term as President in April. He reminds that all Ipswich 
senior citizens 60 years of age or over are welcome to join the activities. 

Beyond the regular programs and activities mentioned, the Department 
cooperates with Little League, the Elementary Girls softball program, two 
men's Softball leagues, and the Chiefs baseball team in scheduling the use of 

61 



playing fields, with the Park crews maintaining them. At present there are 13 
active ballfields within the community. Certain facilities at LaSalette, Don 
Bosco and Notre Dame are annually made available to the Recreation 
Department. Cooperation is also forthcoming from the School Department in 
the periodic use of their athletic facilities. The Ipswich Fish & Game Club and 
William Rust as the new owner of the 60 Newbury Restaurant both made 
several acres of land available for playground use at no cost to the Town. 

PARKS — Three permanent employees make up the maintenance crew 
which is increased to 12 during the peak seasons of late spring, summer and 
early fall. They are charged with the care of 13 ballfields, 9 playgrounds, 8 
tennis courts and all the Town-owned lawns within the community with the 
exception of the cemeteries and certain school areas. Winter months, the 
regular crew is busied with repairing and redecorating equipment and 
maintenance of the Memorial Building. Barbara Robishaw serves as permanent, 
part time secretary. Meetings are set for the first Wednesday of each month at 
7:00 p.m. in the Memorial Building. 



62 




(House of Hinlin photo) 



IPSWICH SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Left to right: 

Richard A. Nylen 
Annette I. George 
Walter J. Pojasek, Chm. 
Patricia Manning 



Term Expires 
1978 
1977 
1979 

1977 



Rear left to right: 
Ernest F. Brockelbank 
Thomas L. Moscarillo, DDS 
Paul K. Gahm 



1978 
1979 
1978 



63 




(House of Hinlin photo) 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

John H. Stella 

The cost of operating the schools has approached a level which can no 
longer be supported by the tax, which has historically been the tax base for 
public education the property tax. 

In the meantime, it is our responsibility to operate the Ipswich Public 
Schools and administer a meaningful educational program for our students. 

We have been notified that our Chapter 70 reimbursements will decrease 
substantially next year and this depressing fact will add a financial strain on the 
already burdened taxpayer. 

Cost analysis, cost controls, cost savings, and bulk purchasing have been 
implemented and have become part of the responsibility for all aspects of the 
operation of our schools. Mr. Chester Buras, Business Manager, has played a 
major role in this process. He has also developed a new budget format — a 
modified program budget which breaks down costs and specifically shows per 
pupil costs in the various educational program areas. 

64 



While we are making every effort to control costs, inflation keeps rearing its 
ugly head. 

Enrollments continue to decrease. On October 1, 1975, the K-12 enrollment 
was 2454. On October 1, 1976, the K-12 enrollment was 2326, a loss of 128 
students. For three consecutive years, we have experienced a declining 
enrollment. 

During the past year, the School Committee phased out the Baptist Church 
basement area and Boone Hall as public school facilities. Approximately 84 
children were transferred to Doyon School 

Reduction in force became a new phenomenon this past year and after much 
study and analysis the School Committee, upon recommendation of the 
administration, authorized the following reductions in force! 

Budget Items for Deletion Approximate Savings 

Rent at Boone $ 9,000.00 

Rent at Baptist 4,300.00 

Telephone and Fire Phone — Baptist 426.00 

Telephone at Boone 303.00 

Maintenance Emergency — Baptist 100.00 

Building Maintenance — Boone 525.00 

Maintenance Equipment — Boone 150.00 

Total $ 14,804.00 
Totals 

Reduction in Force (Teachers) $ 96,099.00 

Reduction in Force (Others) 12,022.00 

Recommended Budget Items for Deletion 14,804.00 

Prand Total $122,925.00 

The staff assessment at all levels continues and at the present time the 
School Committee has authorized 3.5 professional staff positions be reduced. 

On October 1, 1976, Ipswich students enrolled in the Whittier Regional 
Vocational Technical High School totalled 136. 

The reports from the Principals of the schools and the Supervisors list the 
accomplishments of the last year and the progress of the school. 

I extend to the members of the School Committee my sincere appreciation 
for the many hours they spend for Ipswich education. 

I extend to the Administrators, Teachers, Custodians, Secretaries, Cafeteria 
workers and all others, my sincere appreciation for their excellent cooperation. 
Finally, I extend to the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, Police, Highway, 
Fire Department, and other Town Officials, my sincere appreciation for their 
excellent cooperation with the schools. 



65 




(House of Hinlin photo) 






SUPERVISORS 

Ipswich Public Schools 



Front Row, Left to Right: 



John E. Huttunen, Principal, Ralph C. Whipple Memorial School 
Marcia J . Fowler, Principal, Burley and Shatswell Schools 
Joseph J . Battaglio, Director, Pupil Personnel Services K-12 
Lyn Huttunen, Director of Curriculum K-12 

Rear, Left to Right: 

Joseph R. Rogers, Principal, Ipswich High School 
Samuel B. Levy, Principal, Winthrop School 
William E. Waitt, Jr., Principal, Doyon School 



PAUL F. DOYON 
MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

William E. Waitt, Jr., Principal 

The drop in school enrollment has been the most outstanding event of this 
past year. 

In January enrollment was 472, by June we were down to 460 pupils. During 
the summer 85 students were transferred to Doyon from Burley and Shatswell 
Schools in order to close the Baptist and Boone Hall facilities. In September 
we expected 535 students. Because of a number of transfers out of town only 
488 children enrolled. 









66 



Organization 

We continue to be the only school that houses seven grades with three 
sections (classrooms) of each grade — kindergarten through sixth grades. The 
school is also serviced by three learning centers and an L. D. reading teacher 
for students with special needs as required under Chapter 766. 

Curriculum 

Doyon provides a standard curriculum as required with emphasis placed on 
basic skills of Reading, Mathematics and the Language Arts. In addition, 
instruction is provided in Science, Social Studies, Physical Education, Art, 
Vocal Music, and Instrumental Music. 

Emphasis continues on good school citizenship and respect for others. 

Personnel 

Doyon has a staff of 36 full and part time professionals including 22 tenure 
teachers and 4 tenure candidates. 

A service staff of 18 includes 7 kitchen employees, 3 teacher aides, 3 lunch 
part time aides, 2 full time custodians, 1 part time custodian, a part time nurse, 
and a school secretary. 

In June, Mrs. Mary Bamford completed 35 years of service and Mrs. Doris 
Grose ended her 15 years as our efficient secretary. Both were surprised by a 
retirement party given by the staff of Doyon School and was attended by over 
350 friends. Their services and loyalty were greatly appreciated by this 
administration. 



HIGH SCHOOL 

Joseph R. Rogers, Principal 

Enrollment as of October 1, 1976 — 656 

Our enrollment is remaining somewhat constant. Little or no growth in 
Ipswich reflects in our school population. As our enrollment is reduced, 
commensurately our staff is being reduced and we are combining course 
offerings, or alternating them on a yearly basis. Greater emphasis is being 
placed on career education, career awareness and pupil exposure to the world 
of work. 

Federal funding has provided us with monies to expand our offering in 
Science and Social Studies. 

Our I.E. C. A. P. Program, Ipswich Environmental-Civic Action Project, has 
added a new dimension to students involvement in studying civic and 
environmental problems. 

Accountability is a new byword . . . We are responding to the requests by 
School Committee, and the public, by adding a testing program and making our 
successes and failures open to the public. 

67 



The building, after 14 years of use, is showing signs of wear. The facility is 
used eleven months of the year, and during the regular school session the 
facilities are open from 7:30 a.m. until 10:00 p.m. The community is getting full 
use of the high school. 

Curriculum adjustments have been made to accomodate recommendations 
made by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. However, 
changes in the physical facility which were recommended ten years ago, and 
again this past year, have not been done, and signs indicate that they will be 
delayed indefinitely. We are still in dire need of an addition to our library. Our 
youngsters are being denied the use of this vital area in our school because of 
inadequate space. We cannot accomodate 10% of the school's population at 
any given time. 

In conclusion I must state that, while we are sadly lacking in physical 
facility, we are providing our youth with the best possible education. This is 
being accomplished by a group of sincere, hard working and dedicated staff 
members. 

The schools are yours and we invite you to visit and share with us the 
experience of educating your children. 



RALPH C. WHIPPLE 
MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

John E. Huttuen, Principal 

Enrollment 

The enrollment figures for the 1976-1977 school year are as follows: 

Grade 7 226 
Grade 8 215 

441 TOTAL 

Programs and courses 

In accordance with the regulations established by Chapter 622 of the state 
laws, all our courses have been put on a coeducational basis. Last year we 
began phasing in our courses to meet these requirements. Now all are 
operating in full accordance with the laws. The major changes occurred in 
home economics, shop and physical education. 

We are pleased to report that the transition was smooth and that student 
enthusiasm has been very high. 

Math Lab 

Our math lab continues to function fairly well. A major problem has been 
created because Title I monies are no longer available to hire a full time aide to 
work with the students. Some of the slack has been taken up by utilizing 
volunteer parent aides and students during a portion of each day. However, the 
lab is not covered or utilized at a hundred percent efficiency due to the lack of 
a full time aide. 

68 



Buildings and Grounds 

During this school year maintenance projects were kept to a minimum due to 
the fact that only "six thousand eight hundred and twenty five dollars were 
appropriated for regular and emergency maintenance. The major thrust was to 
complete needed projects in the other schools of Ipswich either through the 
regular budget or through bonding. 

The two main projects carried out in our school were the painting of the 
front foyer and replacing shades in some of the classrooms. 

Hopefully, the forth coming budget will have adequate monies included to 
replace lights, paint, replace windows, replace lockers, replace exit doors, etc. 
The school was opened in 1936 and much of the needed work is the result of 
age, heavy use, and impossibility of finding replacement parts. 



WINTHROP SCHOOL 

Samuel B. Levy, Principal 

The Winthrop School houses four classes of grade four, five of grade five 
and five classes of grade six. At the end of the year Winthrop had 339 
students. The Winthrop School Resource Center includes a well stocked library 
with reference works, general reading materials and film, audio and visual 
materials library for use by individuals, group or entire classroom work. A 
shared librarian and a large corps of dedicated volunteer workers supervise the 
center's operation. 

The school day is 6 hours and 15 minutes. Class "A" lunches are served in 
the school cafeteria. Bus transportation is provided for one-half of the student 
body. 

The school provides a standard elementary school curriculum with a flexible 
structure. To enliven the students' interest in their education and environment 
imaginative and innovative approaches are employed. A recent addition in this 
regard is the use of I.E.C.A.P. the Ipswich Environmental Civic Action 
Project. Specialists operate in the areas of art, music and physical education. 
Instrumental music lessons are provided and a chorus meets weekly. There is a 
Grade Four Beginning Band and a Grade Five-Six disabilities and speech 
therapy. A title I ESEA Project provides for a Director and trained teacher 
aides to work in the areas of remedial reading and mathematics. The Title I 
Parents Advisory Council is an active and important part of the project. The 
Winthrop Parents Advisory Council is an active and interesting part of the 
school program. 

In addition to the classroom teachers, the staff includes vocal music, 
instrumental music and art specialists, a full-time physical education teacher, a 
part-time librarian, two full-time learning disabilities specialists, a part-time 
guidance counselor, a full-time guidance counselor, a consulting psychologist, a 
part-time speech therapist and a part-time occupational therapist. A nurse, a 
secretary, two full-time custodians, three cafeteria workers and three 
lunchroom aides complete the staff. 

69 



Many of the staff members are actively engaged in post graduate work and in 
area committees and boards in various areas of education, guidance and 
environmental activities. The entire staff is involved in scheduled workshops in 
the area of curriculum development in the various disciplines. 

Many civic, private and church groups avail themselves of the opportunities 
to use our facilities and equipment after school, evenings and on weekends. 
During the entire year, including the summer, our kitchen facilites were used in 
preparing meals for our senior citizens. 



BURLEY AND 
SHATSWELL SCHOOLS 

Marcia J. Fowler, Principal 

Organization 

Burley School Shatswell School 

2 Kindergarten Sessions 2 Kindergarten Session's 

2 First Grades 3 First Grades 

2 Second Grades 2 Second Grades 

3 Third Grades 1 Third Grade 

1 Library 1 Learning Center 

1 Library 

Total Enrollment 212 Total Enrollment 179 



Classes are self contained. Children have classes each week with Art Music 
and Physical Education specialists. Stress is being placed on individualized and 
differentiated instruction while integrating the curriculum. 

Much communication between the home and the school is accomplished. We 
are happy with the amount and nature of exchange which takes place at our 
Parent Advisory Council Meetings. Many parents volunteer their time to work 
in the classrooms and our libraries. We feel our parent-teacher conferences 
which take place at least twice during the school year are very beneficial. 

Development in basic skills, problem solving, responsibility and creativity 
are being stressed. We are proud to see the growth being made by students in 
working in a manner which is productive for them while allowing others to 
work effectively also. 



70 



DIRECTOR OF CURRICULUM 

Lyn Huttunen 

Assessment and curriculum refinement based on careful research and 
evaluation was a major activity this year. Some of the results of this effort 
toward obtaining the best educational tools and methodology for the children of 
Ipswich can be observed through accomplishments such as the following: 



a. Our four years of work in the area of Language Arts and Mathematics has 
yielded a systematic approach to teaching these basic skills, grades K-8, 
with a record keeping system that has received national attention. The 
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development will display our 
Language Arts and Mathematics Objectives and Record Cards at the annual 
conference to be held in Houston in March, 1977. 

b. Career Day Fairs and learning activities to promote awareness of job 
opportunities continued as a major thrust in grades k-12. Members of the 
community have demonstrated support and provided assistance through 
participating in our local Manpower Survey, by speaking to students on 
specific careers, and by serving on advisory committees. 

c. New strides were made in the area of science as our Ipswich Environmental 
and Civic Action Project engaged students and teachers in many in-depth 
projects and activities at the High School through June of 1976 and then 
expanded to include students and teachers from kindergarten through grade 
12 during the current school year. 

d. In order to comply with the recent legislation guaranteeing equal rights to all 
persons, awareness and assessment workshops were held for all staff 
members with appropriate changes resulting in course offerings, athletic 
opportunities, and curriculum guides. 

In order to supplement local budgetary commitments and to promote 
individualized instruction based on expressed needs, teachers and 
administrators expended a great deal of effort to complete for federal monies. 
Grants were awarded to Ipswich for projects as follows: 

a. Under Title I, ESEA, we received two awards for a total of $26,040.00 to be 
utilized in the basic skill areas of reading and mathematics, grades 3-6. 

b. Under Title II, ESEA, our guarantee of local support in the area of library 
and media has provided us with an additional $1,509.28 to be utilized in the 
Junior High School Library. 

c. Under Title III, NDEA, a project grant of $4,628.50 has provided us with 
materials and equipment to utilize in the High School Mathematics 
Laboratory. 



The preceding accomplishments are only part of our continuous work in 
curriculum development. For the many dedicated educators, students and 
members of the community currently serving on curriculum sub-committees 
and in-service task forces, I can only express simple appreciation for this 
combined effort toward quality education. 

71 



PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

Joseph J. Battaglio, Director 



Despite the decline in births nationally with corresponding reductions in 
school enrollments, the incidence of school children identified as learning 
handicapped has risen drastically. In Ipswich, because of a long-standing 
commitment, the increase has not been dramatic. Still, the number of pupils in 
special needs programs rose form a pre-Ch. 766 figure of 264 (special needs 
census, November, 1974) to 321 by May of 1975 to 370 by June of the same 
year. The high point was reached in June, 1976, when a total of 417 pupils 
were receiving services. Since that time, the figure has stabilized at 
approximately 368 pupils. 

There are clear and obvious reasons both for the increase and for the 
subsequent leveling-off of the special needs population in Ipswich. Foremost 
was the increased general awareness of special learning problems in children 
together with the realization, promoted by Ch. 766, that the schools must 
provide appropriate learning experiences for such children — as indeed for all 
children. Add to this the emergence of specific learning disabilities in children 
as a recognized phenomenon, (national estimates place the number of people 
affected by this language disability at from 10 to 25% of the total population) 
the inclusion of pre-school age (3-5 years) children, and the role of hospitals 
and clinics in referring children for services, and an increase is understandable. 
Stabilization of the special needs population is attributable to remediation 
resulting in termination of services and to the reduction of unnecessary 
referrals through a pre-screening procedure. 

In substance, Ipswich must provide for the special needs of approximately 
16% of its total school enrollment. Projections are risky, but the prospect of 
reducing this population seems countered by trends to return children now in 
public care to the local schools and to force extensive summer and post-high 
school services upon the cities and towns. 

The impact of this continuing demand for services falls upon the total pupil 
personnel services department. I have referred to it and its effects upon the 
health team, the counselors, and special needs staff in previous reports. 
Everyone is over-extended; and it is only because of the quality of staff — and 
its real dedication — that services mandated for children are being provided at 
the current level. Certainly resources have not significantly improved. Burley 
School continues to transfer most of its special needs cases to overcrowded 
programs in other schools, and space and staffing problems remain severe at 
the Winthrop, Doyon, and Junior High Schools. The addition to the staff, 
through federal funding, of a system-wide diagnostician has helped 
immeasurably by reducing the Ch. 766 logistics burden on the staff. Without 
this help, the quality of direct services to children would have been lowered. 

I look forward to the continued support of the Superintendent of Schools and 
of the townspeople expressed through the School Committee for the Continued 
implementation of programs for a significant proportion of Ipswich's school 
children. 



72 



EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED TO MINORS 



7/1/75 — 6/30/76 



Boys, 
Girls , 



Age 
14- 16 

15 
14 



Age 
16- 18 

46 
51 



Total 

61 
65 



ENROLLMENT CHART BY 
GRADES 1971 - 1976 



Grade 


1971 


1972 


1973 


1974 


1975 


1976 


K 


164 


171 


165 


191 


156 


138 


Nongraded Primary 


276 












(1970 & 1971) 














1 


97 


183 


197 


182 


188 


175 


2 


141 


220 


198 


194 


184 


184 


3 


185 


250 


208 


200 


181 


174 


4 


239 


214 


242 


197 


196 


180 


5 


210 


224 


219 


237 


191 


183 


6 


213 


203 


232 


224 


236 


197 


7 


228 


213 


202 


223 


220 


225 


8 


215 


224 


214 


201 


223 


214 


9 


213 


200 


177 


175 


171 


174 


10 


218 


213 


171 


180 


163 


169 


11 


177 


210 


174 


167 


173 


144 


12 


198 


177 


180 


177 


163 


168 


P.G. 


1 


1 


1 




4 


1 


Sp. Ed. 


27 


25 


4 


8 


5 




TOTALS 


2802 


2728 


2584 


2556 


2454 


2326 



ENROLLMENT CHART 
OCTOBER 1, 1976 



Grade 



K 1 



8 9 10 11 12 Total 



Doyon 


55 


71 


74 


75 


72 


68 73 


488 


Burley 


41 


44 


55 


72 






212 


Shatswell 


42 


60 


55 


27 






184 


Winthrop 










108 


115 124 


347 


Jr. High 












225 214 


439 


Sr. High 












174 169 144 168 
PG 1 


655 
1 


Totals 


138 


175 


184 


174 


180 


183 197 225 214 174 169 144 169 


2326 



73 




RICHARD S. SHEPPARD 

1916 - 1977 

Shellfish Constable 



WELL DONE, THOU GOOD AND FAITHFUL SERVANT 



74 



SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 

Edward Paquin, Chairman 

The past year has been one of many changes in the shellfish industry. 
Reduction of clam population on our areas over the last year was worse than 
we had thought, as not only the seed and legal sized clams have disappeared, 
but also the worm population has declined. The closing of the areas last year 
was offset by putting the diggers to work transplanting clams from the river to 
an open area off Eagle Hill. The results were not what was hoped for, as very 
little survived the change in conditions. 

The Shellfish Board and Constable have tried to work out a ten step 
proposal for the river areas in the hope that these areas could be opened for 
harvesting, but to date, there does not seem a chance that this will occur. 
Representative Lane has been doing what he can to pass legislation and get 
State and Local authorities together on the many issues that keep coming up, 
and we would like to thank him for his help. 

Regular meetings have been held on a monthly basis throughout the year to 
handle various problems that arise. The meetings are now held on the first 
Wednesday of the month in the Town Hall. 

Although this report covers the 1976 Calendar Year, the Board and I feel we 
should mention the Town's and our terrible loss: Our meeting in February 
(1977) was marked by a tragic event that took the life of our Constable, 
Richard Sheppard. "Shep" was a dedicated worker who took a deep interest in 
his work. He put in time beyond his normal working hours to seek ways of 
improving our areas and getting state assistance. He will be sadly missed by 
the Board and his many friends. 



TOWN COUNSEL 

Charles C. D alt on 

1976 was a year of continuing litigation and legal activity for Ipswich. Among 
the major items which were initiated or pending were A) a suit in Federal 
District Court in Boston against the Town and the Chief of Police of 
$5,000,000, alleging numerous violations of Federal Civil Rights because of 
allegedly illegal search, illegal seizure, and false arrest; B) cross suits in the 
Essex County Superior Court by the Town and by the Firemen's Union, 
requesting that the award of a labor arbitrator under the compulsory and 
binding police and fire arbitration law be vacated or confirmed; C) a suit in 
Essex County Superior Court by a parent against the School Committee and 
sundry school officials alleging that a child had been deprived of her rights 
under Chapter 766; and D) several appeals to the Appellate Tax Board in 
Boston of denials of abatements by the Board of Assessors. 

In addition to a noticeable increase in the volume of litigation, 1976 was a 
year of transition for the office of Town Counsel. F. Dale Vincent, after eight 
years of loyal and proficient service, resigned at the end of the year. Charles 
C. Dalton was appointed by the Town Manager to succeed Attorney Vincent 
and to assume all of his many duties and ongoing responsibilities. The Board of 
Selectmen and the Town Manager expressed their warm appreciation to 
Attorney Vincent for a job faithfully done. 

75 



VETERANS' SERVICES 

Frank Story. Director 

MASSACHUSETTS VETERANS 1 BENEFITS 

Under Chapter 115 of the Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, the 
Veterans' Benefits Program assists and advises veterans and their dependents 
in securing assistance for which they have entitlement. The program deals with 
hardship resulting from disaster created by illness, strikes, and unemployment. 
It is difficult to estimate accurately the expenditures under this program. The 
number of veterans and their dependents receiving aid monthly, as follows: 
January — 54. February — 49. March — 54. April — 45. May — 48. June — 
50. July — 26. August — 38 September — 42. October — 35. November — 35. 
December — 44. The department processed a total of 520 cases in 1976. There 
were 6 applications for the Vietnam Bonus. Exclusive of the Bonus. 5CR- of the 
cost of the Benefits program is reimbursed by the State. Expenditures are 
listed in the financial statement of the annual Town Report. 



VETERANS" SERVICES — FEDERAL 

Under Federal Code Title 38 the department obtains all Federal funds for 
veterans and their dependents who qualify. Services rendered through this 
program in 19"6 are as follows: 3 Request Pertaining to Military Records from 
Adjutant General"s Office. 1 Selection of Optional Settlement by Beneficiary. 1 
Reinstatement of GI Insurance. 1 Claim for Life Insurance. 64 Annual Income 
Questionnaire cards. 1 Application for Medical Services Outside VA Clinic. 11 
Applications for Reimbursement from Champus & Champva. 6 Applications for 
Chapva. 4 Applications for ID cards. 2 Applications for Civil Service Purpose. 
10 Request for Real Estate Abatement. 11 Treasury Checks returned. 3 Social 
Security checks returned. 62 Rx submitted to VA Clinic. 20 Appointments for 
VA Clinic Examinations. 16 Applications for Social Security Disability. 
Applications for Social Supplemental Income. 1 Application for Wheelchair. 12 
Referrals to VA Hospital Facilities. 4 Massachusetts Income Tax Returns. 15 
Request for Military Records from St. Louis. 5 Review of Discharge or 
Separation. 8 Applications for Bronze Markers. 31 Request for Change of 
Address. 15 Request to Release Information from Claimant's Folder. 
Applications for Dental Benefits. 7 Applications for Medical Benefits. 29 
Applications for Compensation or Pension. 6 Statements of Income & Net 
Worth & Employment Status. 8 Applications for Widow's Pension. 25 Request 
for Approval of School Attendance. 3 Declaration of Marital Status. 
Examination for Housebound Status. 2" Statements of Income &. Net Worth. 
48 Statements in Support of Claim. 5 Request for Additional Information. 3 
Request Concerning Unusual Medical Expenses. 4 Enrollment Certification. 9 
Education Applications. 4 Request for Change of Program. 58 Power of 
Attorney forms. 13 Eligibility Certificates. 3 Designation of Beneficiary and 3 
Applications for Burial .Allowance. 

Compensations and pensions received, and still effective, totaled S484."T6.00 
VA hospitalizations saved the Town S49. 500. 00. S107.468.00 was realized from 
the SSI applications. The education program saved 535.640.00 in 1976. The 
above represents an accrued saving of S677.324.00 for the year 1976. For 
Federal money received, there is no State or Town participation. 

76 



CONSTABLE 
Joyce A. Gysan 
Blank 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Deanna S. Cross 
Walter Pojasek 
Thomas L. Moscarillo 
Blank 

HOUSING AUTHORITY (Five Years) 

Arthur B. Weagle 

Blank 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Herbert E. Brack 
Arthur L. Goodfellow 
Blank 

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 

Anderson & Shackelford 

Camejo & Reide 

Carter & Mondale 

Ford & Dole 

La Rouche & Evans 

McCarthy & Stouffer 

Leven & Blomen 

Mac Bride & Bergland 

Scattered 

Blank 



WATER/SEWER DEPARTMENT 

James E. Chase, Engineer 
WATER DIVISION: 

Henry Chouinard, Foreman 

The Town of Ipswich once again experienced a severe water shortage. This 
shortage was temporarily relieved by the Town of Hamilton which came to our 
aid by diverting 22,000,000 gallons of water into our system. Short-term efforts 
to correct this condition were made at a November 29, 1976 Special Town 
Meeting which authorized the expenditure of funds for the cleaning and 
improvement of the Town's existing well system and for the exploration and 
construction of a new well site. Further efforts were initiated through renewed 
investigation by Town Government into long-term solutions. One of these it 
was hoped would be ready and acceptable. at the 1977 Annual Town Meeting. 
Regardless of the outcome of these efforts to correct this chronic condition, the 
water shortage is expected to be with us for some time to come and every 
resident of Ipswich is asked to conserve water. 



377 


431 


244 


501 


1553 


79 


139 


79 


198 


495 


181 


178 


103 


169 


631 


339 


440 


245 


571 


1595 


307 


409 


218 


500 


1434 


85 


113 


80 


158 


436 


373 


447 


256 


539 


1615 


83 


123 


67 


160 


433 


165 


203 


103 


277 


748 


258 


301 


182 


323 


1064 


33 


66 


38 


99 


236 




2 


4 


4 


10 


2 


3 


- 


3 


8 


473 


809 


556 


847 


2685 


723 


895 


716 


699 


3033 


2 


4 


- 


1 


7 


31 


53 


27 


42 


153 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


5 


- 


3 


- 


8 


9 


24 


15 


23 


71 



1974 1975 1976 



New Meters Installed: 
Meters Replaced: 
Services Turned Off: 
Services Turned On: 



44 


30 


48 


96 


149 


96 


122 


123 


112 


132 


124 


112 



77 



New Services: 


34 


10 


44 


Services Discontinued: 


2 


2 


2 


Hydrants Installed: 








5 


Hydrants Removed: 











New Water Mains Installed: 


2,900' 





1,716' 


Total Length of Mains: 


389,697' 


389,697' 


391,413' 



WATER SERVICES 

Metered Services: 
Unmetered Services: 
Summer Services: 



3,063 


3,072 


3,120 


142 


142 


131 


173 


172 


172 



WATER USAGE 

Dow's Reservoir 
Brown's Well 
Winthrop Wells 
Mile Lane Well 
Total Water Usage: 
Purchased from 

Hamilton: 
Highest Day: 

2/24/74 
Highest Day: 

2/19/75 
Highest Day: 

6/25/76 



197,413,500 
94,789,000 
68,483,600 
27,580,000 

388,266,100 



2,314,000 



212,322,700 

132,181,150 

75,181,188 

32,310,000 

451,995,058 



2,797,000 



139,374,200 
155,735,591 
105,246,842 
26,910,000 
427,266,633 

21,925,000 



2,457,844 



SEWER DIVISION: 

Chester Wile, Treatment Plant Operator 



Construction of new sewer mains were begun on Dornell Road, Avery 
Street, Currier Park and Winter Street. Construction of the new Secondary 
Sewage Treatment Plant off Fowler's Lane neared completion and was 
expected to be ready for Town acceptance in the Spring of 1977. 



Mr. Chester Wile retired on December 31, 1976 after long and faithful years 
as the Chief Operator of our Sewage Treatment facilities. 



Sewage Treated Daily 

(Average Gallons) 
Total Sewage Treated 

(Gallons) 
New Connections 
Total Connections 
Chlorine Used (Tons) 



512,421 

197,885,000 

72 

1,056 

15.45 



551,885 

153,424,000** 

56 

1,112 

15.30 



* Estimated 

**January 1, 1975 — October 5, 1975 Only 



500,000* 

183,000,000* 

24 

1,136 

12.10 



78 



DEPARTMENT OF 
WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

John R. Harrigan, Sealer 
There were a total of fifty five gasoline pumps inspected and sealed at 
various service stations. 

There were a total of fifteen inspections made on unit pricing at 
supermarkets and dry good stores. 

Scales were tested and sealed at a number of farm stands; hardware stores; 
markets; and independent variety stores, totaling 36 scales of various sizes. 

Citizens inquiries were answered and municipal owned gasoline pumps were 
checked and sealed. 

New equipment was purchased and put to use. Scales, Weights and Devices. 

YOUTH COMMISSION 

Cathleen R. McGinley Director 
Robert Wickstrom Chairman 

Activity at the Drop In Center has reached a new all time high during 1976. 
Continual and expanded programs for the teenagers have greatly increased the 
Centers membership. 

In return for the generous support of the Drop In Center by the townspeople, 
the teenagers have performed a number of civic and community projects during 
the past year, which include the following: 

Delivery of Town Reports 

Town*Wide Cleanup on two different occasions 

Lead paint clinic 

Assisted with Council on Aging Tag Day 

Participation in 17th Century Day 

Sweetheart Fair 

Door to door campaign for Jaws of Life 

Many new programs have been established and carried out as follows: 



12 Dances 

4 Summer Concerts 

6 Movies 
16 Trips to McDonalds 

Creation of a Snack bar operated 
by the teenagers at the Center 

2 Basketball & Baseball trips 
Slides of the Winter Olympics 
Kite Workshop & Kite Fly at Cranes 
Egg hunt for children 
Professional pool demonstration 



Folk entertainment night 

Dance Marathon 

Weekend Camping Trip to N.H. 

Summer swimming at Don Bosco 

Summer cookout at Don Bosco 

Trip to Boston's Fanueil Hall 

and Quincy Markets 

Ski night at Hamilton Slopes 

All day ski trip to N.H. 

2 Trips to Friendly Ice Cream 

and Putnam Pantry. 



A special note of appreciation is extended to the volunteers who gave so 
freely of their time to assist our youth at the Drop In Center with the above 
programs. The many contributions and donations of furniture from the 
community are truly appreciated. A special thanks are extended to the Police 
Chief and his Department for their interest and cooperation and to the Friends 
of Ipswich Youth for their continued interest in the youth of Ipswich. 



79 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 

In 1976 the Board held forty-two hearings. Thirty were requests for 
variances, of which twenty were granted, eight were denied, and two were 
withdrawn. Many of those granted were for side or front yard variances for 
house or garages on lots that were too small because they predated the Zoning 
By-law. Three variance requests were for signs, all of them being denied. Other 
requests that were denied were for uses not permitted in the particular zoning 
district. 

Eleven of the hearings were requests for special exceptions involving, 
generally, horses, temporary trailers, and conversion of a building to a two- or 
three-family dwelling. Seven of the requests were granted, one was denied, two 
were dismissed, and one was withdrawn. 

The remaining hearing was an appeal from the Building Inspector's decision 
denying a building permit for an apartment house. The Board was directed by 
the Superior Court to order the issuance of the building permit. 

After the Annual Town Meeting, the Selectmen appointed Michael 
Pascucelli, formerly an associate member, as a regular member, and Mary 
Fosdick was appointed as an associate member. No appointment has been 
made for the second associate membership. 

At the first meeting of the Board of Appeals after the appointments were 
made, James Theodosopoulos and Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. were elected Chairman 
and Vice-Chairman, respectively. 



80 



DEATHS 



During 1976, the following persons, 
retired, died: 



1 Edward Poirier 

2 Samuel Gordon 

3 Lawrence Doty 

4 Hilda Schofield 

5 Joseph Dupray 

6 Frank Blunda 

7 Peter Johnson 

8 Mary Perley 

9 Lloyd Irvine 

10 Dana Parsons 

1 1 Helen Blodgett 

12 Chester Pickard 



January 17, 1976 
January 27, 1976 
March 15, 1976 
May 21, 1976 
June 21, 1976 
June 26, 1976 
July 02, 1976 
July 24, 1976 
July 24, 1-976 
August 01, 1976 
August 02, 1976 
September 28, 1976 



either in active duty with the Town, or 

Tree Warden 

Finance Committee/Park Department 

Public Works Department 

School Department 

School Department 

Highway Department 

Personnel and Welfare Department 

School Department 

Cemetery Department/Power Plant 

Water/Sewer Department 

School Department 

Electric Department 









10 





IPSWICH AT A GLANCE 



Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, Essex County, 6th Congressional District 

Founded 1633-Incorporated 1634 

Governor: Michael S. Dukakis 

U.S. Senator: Edward M. Kennedy 

U.S. Senator: Edward Brook 

U.S. Representative: Michael J. Harrington 

Ipswich is in the 3rd Senatorial District (State) 

State Senator: William L. Saltonstall 

Ipswich is in the 2nd Essex District (County) 

Representative in General Court: David J. Lane 

County Commissioners: John McKean 

Katherine M. Donovan 

Edward H. Cahill 



Government: 

Location: 

Area: 
Geographical Center: 

Population: 
Transportation: 

Tax Rate: 

Total Assessed Value: 

Miles of Roads: 

Fire Department: 

Police Department: 



Water: 

Sewer: 

Electricity: 

Gas: 

Recreational Facilities: 



Zoning: 
Housing: 



Selectmen/Town Manager Charter (State Law) - 

New England Town Meeting 

Located on Massachusetts' North Shore — 35 Miles 

N.E. of Boston — Driving Time 45 minutes 

33.35 Square miles — 21,344 acres 

Pedrick House, corner of Jeffery's Neck Road and 

Ocean Drive 

11,551 (1976) 

Boston & Maine R.R. — Frequent Rail Service — 

Train time to Boston 50 min. U.S. Route 1, U.S. 

Route 1A — Harbor Facilities — Taxi Services 

$70.00 All homes are assessed at approximately 65% 

of fair market value . 

1976 Real Estate and Personal Property $73,948,067 

Approximately 89 

Full-time 18 firemen — 28 call personnel — 

equipment includes one 100' Aerial ladder truck 

Full-time 21 policemen — 25 auxiliaries — 4 radio 

equipped cruisers — 1 inspector — 1 Dog Officer 

with radio equipped van. 

Available to Entire Town 

Available to Part of Town 

Municipal Plant available to entire Town 

Available to 75% of Town 

Supervised Playgrounds — Summer Swimming 

Instruction — Tennis Courts — Softball Diamonds 

— Baseball Diamonds — Public Beaches on 
Seashore — Ponds for Ice Skating (some are lighted) 

— 9 hole Golf Course — Boat Club — Yacht Club 

— Wildlife Sanctuary — Salt & Fresh Water Fishing 

— Movie Theatre — 16 Lane Bowling Alley — Pool 
& Billiards — Golden Age Club — Teen Drop in 
Center 

Protection by comprehensive zoning and planning 

regulations to insure controlled growth of residential, 

commercial and industrial area 

Three Projects (one under construction) 144 units 

provided for low income families and Elderly 

Citizens. 



83 



Schools: 



Churches: 



Medical Facilities: 



Shopping: 



Public Library: 



Health: 



News: 



Industry: 



Four Elementary Schools — Jr. High School — 

High School — Pupil/Teacher Ratio 14/1 — Special 

Classes for Retarded or Perceptually handicapped — 

Kindergartens — Regional Vo Tech High School — 

Comprehensive program of evening classes for 

adults. 

2 Baptist — 3 Catholic — 1 Christian Science — 1 

Congregational — 1 Episcopal — 1 Greek Orthodox 

— 1 Methodist 

12 Physicians — 6 Dentists — 45 Bed Hospital — 

Visiting Nurses — Convalescent Homes — Medical 

Center — Ambulance Service — 2 Pharmacies ... 2 

Veterinarians 

Downtown Business District — Shopping Center — 

Antique Shops — Apparel Stores — Auto Body & 

Supply Shops — Banks — Beauty Shops (Barber 

Shops & Hair Stylists) — Building Supplies — 

Cleaners — Gift Shops — Grocery Stores (fruit & 

vegetable stands) — Hardware Stores — Jewelers — 

Laundromats — Pharmacies — Restaurants — 

Service Stations — Sport Shops — Variety Stores 

and others. 

55,400 volume library — open 6 days a week — 

Micro filmed data — Audio/Visual Equipment 

Dump open 7 days a week — Rubbish Collection 

Weekly — Garbage Collection Weekly in winter, 

twice in summmer 

Two weekly Newspapers — Coverage in three daily 

area papers and two radio stations. 

Sylvania — Six Major Shellfish Plants — Monument 

Manufacturing — Several Woodworking 

establishments 



84 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 2122 00162 129 5 




TOWN DIRECTORY 

AMBULANCE 6-4343 

POLICE 6-4343 

FIRE 6-4321 

(Ipswich residents dial 6 and 4 digits — all others dial 356 and 4 digits — Area Code is 617) 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen Chairman, John M. Pickard 6-2828 

Board of Selectmen Office, Town Hall 6-2262 

Town Manager, Joseph McD. Mitchell .-6-4848 

Town Manager's Office, Town Hall 6-4848 

Accountant, Robert H. Leet, Town Hall 6-3066 

Assessor, Varnum Pedrick, Town Hall 6-4010 

Building Inspector, Ralph Herbert, Town Hall Annex 6-4900 

Cemetery Superintendent, Walter H. Hulbert, Jr 6-3933 

Dog Officer, John B Macken, Dog Pound 6-0588 

Electric Manager, Alfred Tobiasz, Electric Light Bldg 6-4331 

Engineer, James E. Chase, Town Hall Annex 6-5592 

Fire Chief, Theodore Mozdziez 6-4322 

Fire Chief In Charge, Melvin Bowen, Fire Station 6-4322 

Harbormaster, Peter George 6-3820 

Health Agent, Edwin Bronk, Town Hall Annex 6-4900 

Librarian, Eleanor Crowley, Library 6-4646 

Police Chief, Armand Brouillette, Town Hall 6-4343 

Public Works Director, Armand Michaud, Town Hall 6-5591 

Recreation/Parks Director, James H. Daly, Memorial Bldg 6-3767 

Town Clerk, Harold G. Comeau, Town Hall Annex 6-4161 

Town Counsel, Charles C. Dalton 6-0106 

Treasurer/Collector, George C. Mourikas, Town Hall Annex 6-3100 

Youth Director, Cathleen McGinley, Drop In Center 6-0312 

SCHOOL SYSTEM 

School Board Chairman, Walter J. Pojasek 6-3876 

School Superintendent, John H. Stella, Payne School 6-2935 

High School Principal, Joseph R. Rogers 6-3137 

Junior High School Principal, John E. Huttunen 6-3535 

Burley School Principal, Marcia J. Fowler 6-2666 

Doyon School Principal, William E. Waitt, Jr 6-5506 

Shatswell School Principal, Marcia J. Fowler 6-2312 

Winthrop School Principal, Samuel B. Levy 6-2976 

School Nurse 6-5507 

6-3535 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Chairman, Lawrence J. Pszenny 



.6-0596 



BOARD, COMMISSION AND COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

Board of Assessors , Varnum Pedric k, Chief 6-40 1 

Cemetery Commission, Leon B. Turner 6-2656 

Civil Defense, John R. Harrigan, Director 6-3434 

Commuter Rail Committee, John Vincent, Jr 6-5995 

Conservation Commission, Sarah L. Weatherall 6-3860 

Constable, Joyce A . Gysan 6-3504 

Council on Aging, Harold Bowen 6-5335 

Economic & Industrial Development Commission, 

Paul Beswick 6-5624 

Electric Advisory Board, Thomas A. Ercoline, Jr 6-5257 

Fire Station Study Committee, Merle R. Pimentel 6-2173 

Growth Policy Committee, George R. Mathey 6-4215 

Government Study Committee, Irving Small 6-2070 

Board of Health, Edward B. Marsh, M.D 6-5521 

Historical Commission, John F. Conley 6-2567 

Housing Authority, Jane Bokron, Director 6-2860 

Stanley Eustace 6-3392 

Library Trustees, Ann Durey 6-2102 

Mosquito Control Committee, Alice Keenan 6-4465 

Moderator, Harold E. Shively 6-3997 

Planning Board, John T. Beagan 6-3776 

Police Station Study Committee, George Mathey 6-4215 

Recreation & Parks Committee, Charles J. Foley 6-2049 

Registrars of Voters, Barbara J . Rousseau 6-5674 

Shellfish Advisory Board, Edward Paquin 6-5232 

Trust Fund Commissioners, Elton B. McCauseland 6-5925 

Waterways Study Commission, Walter G. Petrowicz 6-3671 

Youth Commission, Robert Wickstrom 6-0225 

Zoning Board of Appeals, James Theodosopoulos 6-2336 



MEETINGS 



CHAIRMAN 



DAY & TIME 



PLACE 



Annual Town Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Board of Assessors 
Board of Health 
Board of Selectmen 
Cemetery Commission 
Conservation Commission 
Council on Aging 
Economic/ Indu st. Dev. Com. 
Finance Committee 
Historical Commission 
Housing Authority 
Library Trustees 
Planning Board 
Recreation/ Parks Com. 
School Committee 
Shellfish Advisory Com. 
Waterways Study Com. 
Youth Commission 
Zoning Board of Appeals 



Varnum Pedrick 
Edward B. Marsh, MD 
John M. Pickard 
Leon B. Turner 
Sarah L. Weatherall 
Harold Bowen 
Paul Beswick 
Lawrence J. Pszenny 
John F. Conley 
Stanley Eustace 
Ann Durey 

Charles Foley 
Walter J. Pojasek 
Edward Paquin 
Walter G. Petrowicz 
Robert Wickstrom 
James Theodosopoulos 



2nd Mon. in May 

1st Mon. in May 

Every Monday 

2nd Thurs. ea. mo. 

Every Monday 

1st Mond. ea. mo. 

1st & 3rd Tues., ea. mo. 

1st Wed. ea. mo. 

3rd Mon. ea. mo. 

4th Wed. ea. mo. 

Every Thursday 

2nd Tues. ea. mo. 

3rd Mon. ea. mo. 

Every other Tues. 

2nd Wed. ea. mo. 

1st & 3rd Thurs. ea. mo. 

1st Wed. ea. mo. 

1st Tues. ea. mo. 

2nd & 4th Tues. ea. mo. 

3rd Thurs. ea. mo. 



Precinct Polling Place 

High School 

Town Hall Annex 

Health Office, Annex 

Town Hall 

Cemetery Office 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Electric Building 

Electric Building 

Town Hall 

Comm. Bldg. Caroline Ave. 

Library 

Town Hall 

Memorial Building 

To Be Announced 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Drop In Center 

Town Hall